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Hellesdon High pupils help with Refugee Week

 

On Tuesday June 19 a performance evening of music, drama and poetry is being held at The Octagon Chapel, Norwich.

The Norwich Schools of Sanctuary Showcase is part of the official programme of events for Norwich’s Refugee Week celebrations and has been organised by Norwich Schools of Sanctuary to raise funds for organisations that support refugees locally and across the world.

The event will also see the launch of the Come Yew In! songbook for schools which includes songs inspired by stories of migration to the city.

Original pieces of music, poetry, art and drama created by school children of Norwich will be performed, alongside music and drama by Norwich International Youth Project and The Common Lot.

Children from Bignold Primary School and Lakenham Junior School have all worked alongside The Common Lot to produce new songs for the event.

While pupils from Avenue Junior School, Ashleigh Primary School, Hellesdon High School and Notre Dame High School will work on the day with local arts facilitators The Friend Ship to create an art installation inspired by this year’s Refugee Week theme – the contributions, creativity and resilience of refugees – to decorate the venue.

Preceding the event there will be a free exhibition at Martineau Hall which neighbours The Octagon Chapel. The performance will be from 6.30-8pm and tickets cost £5 for adults and £2.50 for children.

They are available on the door on the night or can be reserved by emailing info@norwichschoolsofsanctuary.org. All money raised will be divided equally between the Friend Ship, Help Refugees, Norwich International Youth Project and New Routes.

Simon Floyd, Director of the The Common Lot, said “We are so proud to have created this songbook and be part of this event. The songs and art on show are inspired by stories of people seeking sanctuary in our city and created by the children and young people of Norwich. All of the work embodies a spirit of welcome. They are made for, with and about people right across the city. They paint pictures of the past, sound a warning, and encourage us to celebrate our similarities and our differences.”