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Review: A bittersweet opening night

Review

Intimate Exchanges (Events on a Hotel Terrace)
Sheringham Little Theatre
Friday, July 21

Sheringham Little Theatre’s summer season began with with Intimate Exchanges (Events on a Hotel Terrace), a play by Alan Ayckbourn.
Intimate Exchanges is a series of plays – all starting from the same scene of whether or not a woman should have a cigarette.
From this starting point the play progresses in different directions and Events on a Hotel Terrace plays out the lives of the two main characters, Toby Teesdale (Tim Welton) and his wife Celia (Lynn Whitehead).
In this bittersweet comedy – more often bitter than sweet, with some very funny moments – they argue and fight but never come together in a marriage which seems to have lost all meaning for them.
Toby is a world-weary jaded headmaster of a private school; his wife is the downtrodden receiver of his bitterness and the butt of his cruel humour.
There are two other characters – Lionel and his one-time girlfriend, Sylvie, who helps Celia in the home. All four characters are played by Tim Welton and Lynn Whitehead, actors with flair and empathy.
The play is fast moving and kept the full capacity audience sometimes on the edge of their seats; sometimes laughing aloud; and at times saddened by the way the lives on stage seemed to be heading.
It was a fantastic performance and a wonderful opening to the summer season which looks full of promise of more to come.

Kevin and Sandra Stone

 

REVIEW: Breakfast At Tiffany’s, Norwich Theatre Royal

The scene was set beautifully at the Norwich Theatre Royal for the adaptation of Breakfast at Tiffany’s last night.

Lovers of the film need to go with an open mind and not expect a carbon copy of the onscreen version as there are significant differences due to the fact that the show is based on Truman Capote’s  novella from 1958.

Georgia May Foote (pictured) plays Hollie Golightly,  a sexual and vibrant but confused character who denies reality as a buffer to coping with what life has to offer her. She uses her feminine allure to manipulate the men in her life. Her Hillbilly origins come through, fighting with the sophistication of her ‘now’ life. However, unlike her character in the film, her vulnerability is only glimpsed at a couple of times throughout the play.

The main male character Fred, played by Matt Barber, is infatuated with his new neighbour Hollie and the two become friends. He is also the narrator for the story and effortlessly slips from this role to his character wonderfully. At times it seems as if more will come of their relationship but it is not to be . . .

I loved the 1930’s vibe with scenery and characters deftly moving from one scene onto the next. That and the minimalist set were just so effective. And the cat, there was dispute whether it was real or not, was a lovely treat, especially when it ran from one side of the stage to the other right on cue, perfect!

The play is on at the Theatre Royal until November 19. Book online at www.theatreroyalnorwich.co.uk or call the box office on 01603 630000.

KATHERINE MOORE

gmf

 

Review: Summer Show success at Cromer Pier Pavilion

The Fantastic Cromer Pier Show had its debut night on Saturday, June 25, and what a show.
Each year it gets better and more entertaining, if thats possible, and this year is no exception.
There’s a talented and international line-up of star performers. Comedy juggler from Australia, James Bustar, had the audience amazed by his skills and, at the same tim,e laughing at his banter, what a find for Cromer.
The two lead vocalists, Emily Yarrow and Rob McVeigh, were an absolute joy to listen to. Rob with his mellow voice was equally at home with ballads and pop, Emily had the audience enthralled with her excerpt rom Die Fledermaus, known as the laughing song.
A local homegrown talent is comedy impressionist Marea Smithson, who appeared on the 2012 Britain’s Got Talent. Marea can also sing and dance. The seaside special dancers are the backbone of the show and, in their fabulous costumes, dazzle and delight throughout. The young performers from Marlene’s School of Dance were charming and danced beautifully.
The man making the show flow seamlessly is compere and comedian Phil Butler, a very funny man with enormous talent.
The costumes, lighting, scenery and music all go to make this as much an experience of the magic of theatre as a variety show. Cromer is very fortunate to have such a venue that is supported by North Norfolk District Council, which brings a variety of talent and entertainment to Norfolk. The Famous Cromer Pier Show runs throughout the summer season.
Kevin and Sandra Stone
Pictures by Dave (Hubba) Roberts
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