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Are you recycling right?

Give your recycling a little bit of love or in other words, make sure it’s clean, dry and don’t bag it when to goes into the recycling bin. This is the message the Norfolk Waste Partnership wants residents to heed as part of a major push to Recycle for Norfolk in August and September.

The revitalised recycling message comes in the wake of national research by the charity WRAP, which promotes the sustainable use of resources, that found overall, 64% of households’ dispose of one or more items incorrectly because of a lack of information about what and how to recycle.

John Fisher, chair of the Norfolk Waste Partnership explained: “We want to make sure Norfolk residents have the information they need to understand how and what to recycle at home. There are three simple rules to remember to get recycling right in Norfolk: Clean, Dry and Don’t Bag it.”

The campaign reinforces the rules in a leaflet which will go to every Norfolk home in September. Posters, radio, television adverts and online information will remind everyone how to recycle right. In 2015/16 Norfolk’s recycling rate was 45% which compares well to the published recycling rate for England as a whole which was 43%.

Mr Fisher added: “Getting recycling right is everyone’s responsibility. All of our councils and crews work hard to empty our bins and when they find a recycling bin full with unwashed food containers and in many instances, used nappies and even pet food, it can be soul-destroying. It is especially unpleasant for the people at our material recovery facility who hand sort Norfolk’s recycling material.”

There is also a cost when people don’t follow the rules on recycling. Whilst it is 33% cheaper to recycle one tonne of material than dispose of it as rubbish, last year Norfolk’s district, borough and city councils paid an additional £430,000 to have Norfolk’s recycling material cleaned-up before it could be made into new products. If everyone makes sure their recyclable materials are clean, dry and loose and that they are placed in the right bin, it will save money.

Along with the leaflet that will be delivered to Norfolk households in September, details about what can and cannot be recycled in Norfolk can be found at www.recyclefornorfolk.com or via Twitter and Facebook: @Recycle4Norfolk

Your old TV could help save a life

Norwich City Council and the British Heart Foundation are giving people another chance to recycle their small and medium-sized unwanted electrical and electronic items this Saturday (January 28), and in doing so help support people with heart disease.

Their last event was a huge success with the British Heart Foundation totting up items to the value of £6,300 – enough to pay for six defibrillators.

Don’t bin it, bring it will take place at the St Paul’s Church, Tuckswood, Norwich, NR4 6BH. People are invited to bring along their small and medium-sized electrical items (working or non-working) between 8am and 1pm.

Items such as toasters, hairdryers, mobile phones, TVs, games consoles and kettles will all be gratefully received. Commercial waste and larger items, such as fridges or ovens will not be accepted.

The British Heart Foundation will be at the event collecting items which are suitable for re-use and eventual resale from their local Norwich store. The money made from selling your old TV could be used to help fund research into heart disease, or teach children about the importance of exercise.

Norwich City Council will be recycling all items which are not suitable for re-use. Recycling makes the most out of the valuable metals in electrical equipment as well as keeping it out of landfill where it gives off harmful gases.
Computers will be accepted at the event but they will be dealt with exclusively by the British Heart Foundation which will ensure data is cleared before resale. Norwich City Council can take no responsibility for donation of computers.

To find out more about recycling go to www.norwich.gov.uk/recycling

Hellesdon children get hands-on with rubbish

Children from Kinsale Infant School recently got hands-on with rubbish, in a session designed to help them learn about recycling.
Waste and recycling officers from Broadland District Council visited the school in Hellesdon to talk about what happens to our rubbish after we put it in the bin. And 50 Year 2 children found out what you can and can’t recycle, where they had to separate a mix of correct and incorrect items into recycling and rubbish bins during a practical sorting exercise.
The children found out that that items for recycling need to be clean (without food or liquid remains), loose (not in bags) and correct (accepted for recycling by the council). They looked at items such as envelopes, foil and clean plastic trays, which can all be recycled, and crisp packets, sweet wrappers and plastic food wrapping which need to be placed in the general waste bin.
They also learned about where both rubbish and recycling goes once it leaves our homes, and how it is better for the environment to reuse and recycle where possible.
The children were given quiz sheets to take home, with activities and games to test their new knowledge, and the chance to win a prize of a recycled stationery set if they complete the worksheets.
Lesly-Ann Coughlan, class teacher at Kinsale Infant School, said: “This was an informative session and the children took a lot of new knowledge home about the type of things that can and cannot be recycled.”
John Fisher, Broadland District Council’s portfolio holder for environmental excellence, said: “It’s great to see schoolchildren getting involved in something as fundamental as recycling. We hope that they’ll become recycling champions and encourage their families to recycle correctly at home.”
Find out what you can and cannot recycle in Broadland at www.broadland.gov.uk/recycling

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Recycle your Christmas leftovers

Christmas may be a fun time of year, but it also produces a huge amount of waste. This year, Norwich City Council is offering residents even more ways to recycle their Christmas leftovers.

Christmas trees
There will be a ‘real’ Christmas tree drop off point in Waterloo Park car park until January 13. Decorations must be removed first. Trees can also be taken to Swanton Road recycling centre.

Leftover food
Gone overboard with the Christmas food shopping? Norwich City Council offers a weekly food collection service. Simply pop your leftovers in your black food caddy and place out next to your recycling or refuse bin on your collection day.

Wrapping paper and cards
Clean wrapping paper and cards can all be recycled in your blue bin. Christmas cards can also be recycled through some city centre  stores.

Unwanted presents or just having a clear out? 
Did Santa get it wrong this year? Norwich City Council will collect any unwanted small electrical items, such as hairdryers or shavers, as well as old batteries, as part of anew weekly service. They can also collect your unwanted textiles. Simply put  electrical items and batteries in a standard sized plastic bag, textiles in a separate bag, and leave beside the recycling or refuse bin on collection day.

Unwanted presents can also be donated to a favourite charity shop.

For more information about waste and recycling go to www.norwich.gov.uk/recycling

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Improved recycling at three North Norfolk coastal resorts

Cromer, Sea Palling and Mundesley and have improved recycling and waste collection facilities in a project funded by North Norfolk District Council.

A range of different designs of bin have been installed at the coastal resorts in advance of the extra pressure of the summer tourism season. New solar bins are also being trailed in Wells.

The improved recycling and waste collection facilities have been introduced in response to the changing demand in types of litter, especially fast-food packaging. Each style of bin has been chosen for specific reasons – whether it is to aid recycling (a condition of the Blue Flag scheme), deal with large volumes of waste in remote locations or to improve the appearance of facilities.

Angie Fitch-Tillett, Cabinet Member for Environmental Services said: “Managing the waste and recycling in public places is vital, especially as we approach the summer season. Assessing the changing needs of our communities and listening to feedback means the Council can deliver a better service.”

Mundesley Recycling