Archives

Shoes boost mayor’s hospital charity

A mayor’s charity is taking a giant stride forward thanks to the donation of brand new shoes.
North Walsham mayor Barry Hester has already raised £2,850 for his civic charity, the town’s hospital League of Friends, which provides “extras” for patients, visitors and staff.
The latest boost to the funds comes from the gift of a dozens of pairs of shoes from local businesswoman Ann Bullimore, following the closure of her shop in the precinct.
A range of children’s women’s and men’s shoes will be sold for the charity on Sunday, February 24, at the White Swan pub between 11am and 2pm.
Barry said: “We are grateful for the donation – which will enable people to get bargain shoes and us to boost the Friends’ funds.”
He is hoping to top £3,000 through the shoe sale, annual civic dinner in April and a planned comedy night in June.
Picture: Richard Batson

Deputy mayor Mary Seward with some of the shoes which will be for sale.
PICTURE: RICHARD BATSON

Council statement on North Walsham Wetherspoon’s plan

Following recent questions and speculation about the status of the proposed plan for a JD Wetherspoon to be developed in North Walsham, North Norfolk District Council has issued a statement, which sets out the current position.

JD Wetherspoon approached the district council in 2014 requesting an unencumbered freehold sale on the New Road site, meaning all occupants would need to move out.

This would then allow the company to develop a pub/restaurant on the site, which the district council believed would strengthen the town centre through generating additional footfall and visitors.

These moves were successfully facilitated by the district council and, by September 2016, the building was empty of occupants and subsequently secured. A contract for JD Wetherspoon to pursue the purchase of the site was agreed in 2016.

A right of way/footpath challenge was raised in 2017 and resolved, meaning this challenge is no longer a legal impediment to the sale of the site pending development.

The council believes there are no legal impediments whatsoever to progressing with the sale of the site, or any other impediments for JD Wetherspoon to submit or discuss with planners detailed plans of their proposals – which has not been the case to date.

The council has done everything in its power to make the site available to JD Wetherspoon in good order and in a timely fashion and wants to ensure a certain, economically viable future for the site to the benefit of North Walsham.

The council is currently waiting for JD Wetherspoon to confirm its intentions for the property.

Eric Seward, deputy leader of North Norfolk District Council and ward member for North Walsham (North), said: “This is a run-down prime town centre site. It is more than four years since JD Wetherspoon first expressed an interest in coming to North Walsham. The district council has done its best to accommodate JD Wetherspoon. However, in the last few weeks there have been conflicting messages from the company over whether they wish to open new pubs in Norfolk.

“The company chairman says no new pubs will be opened in Norfolk, but other company representatives give an opposite message. This saga has to come to an end. Are JD Wetherspoon going to open a new pub in North Walsham or are they no longer interested?”

£860,000 artificial pitch plans approved for North Walsham

Plans for an artificial grass sports pitch in North Walsham were approved at a meeting of North Norfolk District Council’s cabinet.

The facility, which would be available primarily for football, but with other sports depending on wider demand, will cost an estimated £860,000. It will be developed as a joint project between the council, the Football Foundation and North Walsham High School.

The pitch will be available for both school and public use. The facility will be floodlit and fully enclosed, and provide improved parking and changing facilities on the school site.

Under the proposals, the school will provide the land with North Norfolk District Council paying 40% of the capital cost, and the Football Foundation paying the remaining 60%.

A feasibility study commissioned by the council identified an initial cost estimate of £810,000 for the pitch plus applications for funding, design and planning; plus another £50,000 to add a “shock pad” system so the facility can cater for other sports such as rugby.

The latter £50,000 cost was not eligible for Football Foundation funding, meaning NNDCs contribution would be £374,000 and the Football Foundation contribution £486,000.

North Norfolk District Council will submit a funding application for an April 2019 deadline, with a decision being made by the FA in July 2019 and completion before the end of 2019.

The council will largely recoup its capital costs via user income. The income will also provide a fund for future renewal of the pitch surface which has an estimated lifetime of around 10 years.

A council spokesman said: “We have been working with the Football Association (FA) for some time on this proposal and the need for the artificial grass pitch was clearly made. There is good demand from clubs locally and a particular emphasis on girls’ and women’s football.

“There is also a growing emphasis on walking football for older people.”

Extra funding for North Norfolk market towns

Funding for a wide range of projects designed to improve the economic vitality of North Norfolk’s four inland market towns has been approved.

A meeting of North Norfolk District Council’s Cabinet agreed to a set of recommendations today which had been put forward by the Market Towns Initiative working group.

Each town was able to bid for £100,000 to spend on projects enabling them to take part in the development of their economic future. The money comes from a total pot of £400,000.

Around £130,000 remains in the Market Towns Initiative fund and a second round of applications will be opened to access this money, with the closing date for these applications being February 12.

The amount any one town can receive in total will remain at a maximum of £100,000 – so if a town received £50,000 in the first round, it would be able to bid for up to £50,000 in the second round.

Sarah Butikofer, leader of North Norfolk District Council and chairman of the MTI working group, said: “I was delighted by the range of projects that were put forward and very pleased that cabinet ratified the recommendations of the working group this morning. All of our communities deserve our support.”

The nine successful applicants included:

The Holt Society – £7,210 to design and print a pamphlet and five notice boards to provide information on the Holt Owl Trail to residents and visitors.

Love Holt – £26,000 to implement a major marketing campaign for the town designed to increase visitors and trade.

Holt Town Council – £17,514 for projects including an accessible Yellow Brick Route, and a Holt park-and-ride scheme.

Regenerate North Walsham and North Walsham Town Council – £99,575 to implement three major improvement projects split between improving St Nicholas Court, the town centre and attracting more visitors to the town.

St Nicholas Court in North Walsham

Body of missing North Walsham man found

Police confirmed the body of a man was found in North Walsham this morning (Friday 23 November 2018).

It’s after officers were called by a member of the public reporting a body of man had been discovered in a field off Happisburgh Road.

While formal identification is yet to take place, it is believed to be that of 46-year-old Julian Gaunt who was reported missing from the area on Monday (19 November). His next of kin have been informed.

The death is currently being treated as unexplained, but detectives do not believe there are any suspicious circumstances.

Becky brings Swing Train craze to Norfolk

It’s so new it hasn’t even got a Wiki page yet.

But Swing Train – dance/fitness set to belting Charleston, swing, gospel, electro-swing and jazz tunes – has reached Norfolk from London thanks to Sprowston resident and former North Walsham-area schoolgirl Becky Powell.

With the growing popularity of vintage fashion and music Becky hopes those who love that era, and anyone looking for a new, strictly-fun way to work out, will give it a whirl.

Swing Train borrows moves from vintage dance styles such as lindy hop which are blended into a cardio workout suitable for all levels of fitness.

Becky, who grew up in Worstead, discovered it while living in London where she trained as an instructor in several forms of fitness.

She has been dancing, and loving it, since joining the north Norfolk-based Footnotes school as a 12-year-old. Later, as a student, she was an active member of York University’s ballet society.

Initially, it didn’t look as though Becky would follow her feet into a career. An academic high-flyer, she gained four As at A-level and went on to graduate from York with a first-class honours degree in maths and physics.

Convinced she wanted to become a school teacher, Becky studied for her post-graduate certificate of education at Cambridge University and landed a job at a primary school near Watford.

“I wanted everyone to love learning and they didn’t,” she remembered. “The teaching part was OK but it was everything else – I was in work at 7am and left at 7pm with a load of books to mark – and I found behaviour management difficult. I spent Boxing Day drawing up a seating plan for seven boys who couldn’t sit next to each other!”

She left to take up a post as an “explainer” at the Science Museum in London, spending 18 months bursting balloons, blowing bubbles and breaking eggs to help children understand everything from why it hurts to sit on one nail but not hundreds, and the manufacture of poo in the digestive system.

Next came a brief spell back at university when Becky began and soon gave up an MSc degree course in aerodynamics and advanced computation.

After a lot of soul-searching, she then decided to follow her passion and become a dance/fitness teacher.

Becky funded her training in London with a part-time job and gained qualifications as an instructor in Swing Train, Booty Barre and bbarreless – the last two being combinations of dance, pilates and yoga.

Since moving back to Norfolk Becky has started teaching at White House Farm, Sprowston; County Hall, Norwich; and in North Walsham, where she also runs an adult beginners’ tap-dancing class.

“I absolutely love it all,” she said. “Dance and fitness make me feel free and wonderful and I love passing on that passion.

“I’m pleased I’ve given so many things a try. I would regret more not giving something a go. It’s better to be brave and bold – and see what happens!”

  • Visit: https://www.inertiafitness.co.uk, email becky@inertiafitness.co.uk or text/call: 07748300091.
  • PICTURES BY JACQUELINE HARMER

 

 

Are you inspired to join the run?

The medals have arrived everyting is in plce for Sunday’s inaugural Inspired 2 Run Fun Run.

Representatives from Inspired Youth and Break Charity spoke to students from North Walsham Manor School Road Junior School this week about the planned event.  Organiser Rob Whitwood, from Inspired Youth, bought along a sample of some of the medals that will be used on the day for the students to see.

He said: “It was great to talk to such a large group about the work Inspired Youth already does with the school supporting our cookie project, and explain how the idea of the fun run got started.  When I’ve been training over the last nine months, my circuit round town takes me pastd the school, so it has been nice working up to this point.”

Rob was joined by senior fundraising officer Danielle Gravestock (pictured), from Break Charity. She explained to the students about the work that she does in raising money for Break and the important services Break provides to young people and families in the region.  She said: “Thank you for inviting Break to be a part of this and allowing us the opportunity to speak to the brilliant pupils at North Walsham Junior School today. Sunday will be amazing.”

The fun run is taking place this Sunday, May 6, with opportunities for both young and old to take part.  A short circuit is being created for the young runners, and a 5k circuit for the adults. Runners can participate on their own or as part of a relay team, if covering the 5k distance is too much of a challenge.

“I’m really hoping this can be the start of an amazing project to help the health and wellbeing of local people, as well as support these two organisations that work with thousands of young people every year. It’s inspired me to run, I hope it does the same for others,” said Rob.

More details on how to get involved are on this website http://www.inspired-youth.co.uk/inspired-2-run/

 

 

Gold medalist heading back to North Walsham

Commonwealth Games gold medalist and world-renowned squash pro James Willstrop will be heading back to where it all started on Saturday, May 26.
James won the biggest singles title of his career, beating New Zealand’s Paul Coll 11-9, 11-4, 11-6 to take gold in what he said will be his last Commonwealth Games.
The 34-year-old said: “It just clicked, it was the stuff you dream of.”
James and his father, Malcolm, who coached him as a youngster and was a coach at Rossis in the 1980s, will be coming back to North Walsham to help celebrate 40 years of Squash at Rossis with a special exhibition and dinner. James and Daryl Selby, England No 3, will warm up on court with Matthew Bolt and Tom Smith (No 1 and 2 at Rossis) prior to their exhibition match to be played on both courts in two halves. While, on the other court, Malcolm Willstrop will be running a coaching session with Tom Smith, current Rossis coach, Craig Aldred who coaches at Barnham Broom and Henry Geaves, an up-and-coming player. Later that evening, Rossis will host a two-course hog roast dinner with speeches, live music and the sharing of memories.
Entry will be by ticket only which can be obtained from Rossis on 01692 404966.
Owner Bruce Rossi, said: “Squash has been synonymous with Rossis for many years and to welcome world-class players and coaches back to where it all started is significant.”
Rossis, or North Walsham Bowls Club as it first was, opened its doors in September 1978 on a field next to the family farm with four indoor rinks, followed just a couple of months later with the building of two Banbury Squash Courts.