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Traders meeting to discuss future of seaside towns

Sheringham and Cromer chambers of trade are meeting this month to discuss the future prosperity of the local economy.

The two groups have got together the personalities who shape the future of the two towns to hear what they have to say and give businesses the opportunity to express concerns and hopes.

The meeting is being seen as a “one-off opportunity to have your say to those that matter” and will be held on Tuesday, September 26, 6-8pm, at Sheringham Golf Club.

A top table of invited guest has been assembled of North Norfolk MP Norman Lamb, Nigel Best, who is the growth hub manager for New Anglia, Rob Young, head of economic and community development at North Norfolk District Council, and town mayors David Gooch and John Frosdick. The meeting will be chaired by the leader of the district council, Tom FitzPatrick.

The panellists will give a brief presentation of their views on the outlook for the areas from their perspective to be followed by a question and answer session from the audience

Anyone wishing to attend is being asked to confirm by September 24 to Economic.growth@north-norfolk.gov.uk or telephone 01263 516009. Any topics you specifically would like to be discussed must be submitted by September 19.

PICTURE: CHRIS TAYLOR PHOTO

SAVED: Future of Itteringham shop is secure

Itteringham village shop has been saved from closure by North Norfolk District Council.

The future of the the community shop had been uncertain because its current owners had served notice on the Itteringham Community Association (ICA) to terminate the lease. The notice expires on October 8.

But at today’s NNDC Cabinet meeting, a proposal to buy the shop and the adjoining Fair Meadow House was approved.

The purchase for an undisclosed amount means the shop will stay in its current location and will be leased to the ICA.

The decision has be greeted with delight by those associated with the shop who were at the meeting to hear the decision. Around a dozen volunteers and staff are involved in its running.

Back at the shop, staff member Alice Ridgeway said: “It’s wonderful news that NNDC has agreed to buy the shop. It’s is so much more than just a shop, it’s a lifeline for many people.”

She thanked the council and all the supporters who had been behind the campaign to keep it open, saying: “It’s really lovely that so many people care about the shop and its future.”

Tom FitzPatrick, leader of North Norfolk District Council, said: “This is an important community asset and it is fantastic that its future has been secured. There was a huge desire locally and further afield to see this shop saved. We are delighted to have helped achieve this for Itteringham and for the remarkable and dedicated community group which runs the shop.”

Judy Oliver, NNDC cabinet member for corporate assets and commercialisation, said: “As well as supporting the local community in Itteringham, this is also a sensible move from a commercial point of view. It will generate income for the council above that achievable from a cash investment, and to be supporting the local community at the same time makes it a win-win.”

The ICA has successfully run the shop for 25 years and there is potential to expand the shop and café, subject to any necessary planning consent, into the currently unused gallery space.

Fair Meadow House is a well maintained and attractive five-bedroom period property with letting and holiday letting potential.

 

North Norfolk District Council to consider buying Itteringham shop

A village shop dating from 1637 which faces closure could be saved by an offer to buy it by North Norfolk District Council.

The future of the Itteringham Community Shop has been uncertain because its current owners have served notice on the Itteringham Community Association to terminate the lease and the notice expires on October 8.

NNDC will consider buying the shop and adjoining Fair Meadow House at a Cabinet meeting on September 5.

The purchase would maintain the shop in its current location, while representing a prudent investment for the Council in line with its Asset Commercialistion Strategy.

Leader of North Norfolk District Council, Tom FitzPatrick, said: “The shop is an important community asset and we see an opportunity to help secure its future hand in hand with the dedicated community group which runs it very successfully.

“There is a huge desire both locally and by visitors to Itteringham to see this shop saved and we appreciate how deeply concerned people are for its future.”

Judy Oliver, North Norfolk District Council cabinet member for corporate assets and commercialisation, said: “We believe the purchase is a financially viable step which will generate income for the council above that achievable from a cash investment. This makes sense both from the point of view of supporting one of our communities and from a business perspective.”

A spokesman for the Itteringham Community Association said: “The association is incredibly grateful to North Norfolk District Council and their officers for their interest and support. With their backing, we are very hopeful that we will be able to Save Our Shop.”

The ICA has successfully run the shop for 25 years and there is potential to expand the shop and café, subject to any necessary planning consents, into the currently unused gallery space.

Fair Meadow House is a well maintained and attractive five bedroomed period property with letting and holiday letting potential.

The proposal is to purchase Fair Meadow House and the shop, to lease the shop and gallery to the ICA and to let Fair Meadow House as a holiday let, managed by the ICA.

Inspired collection by local photographer goes on show in Cromer

North Norfolk District Council’s public art gallery is showing work by local photographer Paul Macro.

The Inspired by Norfolk exhibition highlights the sights of the Norfolk coast with its dark winter skies, rough seas and fiery sunsets.

“The sights, sounds and smells of the Norfolk coast are woven into my soul and my happy childhood is a bright tapestry of memories,” Paul said. “I’m a Norfolk man, born and brought up in Norwich, and seaside holidays at Burnham Overy Staithe played an important part in my childhood.

“Several times a year, at all times of the year, my family spent holidays and weekends in our caravan, where the beauty of Norfolk’s unspoiled beaches and wide skies provided the backdrop to our other world, where there was peace and contentment and sibling harmony.

“My passion for Norfolk’s dark winter skies and rough seas, fiery sunsets and tough, wind-slapped greenery was born from an early exposure to these beauties – before I knew they were beautiful.”

Paul is proud that his work has helped local charities, and he has received orders for his charity calendars from every continent. The RNLI, Nelson’s Journey, Break and Red Balloon are amongst the charities that have benefited from his support.

“My life has been shaped by the landscape and the people of Norfolk and this is my way of giving a little bit back,” he said.

Maggie Prior, cabinet member for leisure and culture, said: “This is another fantastic display, and it’s lovely to see our exhibition space being used for such wonderful work. Paul brilliantly combines his natural skill and the wonderful Norfolk landscapes in his work.”

The exhibition runs until September 13 at the NNDC offices gallery in Holt Road, Cromer. The 1st Floor Gallery is open to the public 8.30am-5pm on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays; at 10am-5pm on Wednesdays; and at 8.30am-4.30pm on Fridays.

Any inquiries about the pictures, which are for sale, should be made to Paul through his website at www.paulmacrolandscapes.com, via info@paulmacro.com or by calling 07727 644092.

Fly tipper prosecuted with help of landowner

A fly tipper was caught and prosecuted for two offences thanks to the combined efforts of a landowner and North Norfolk District Council.

The North Norfolk man was one of two individuals who drove to an area close to Northrepps Cottage, near Cromer, in July  last year.

They fly tipped a wardrobe and threw the wooden panels around the woodland. A CCTV camera installed by landowner Simon Gurney was triggered by the vehicle movement.

In August, one of the men returned to the same area after receiving a letter from the council asking him to come in for an interview under caution and covered the area with toilet roll.

Mr Gurney, who since 2007 has been managing a landscape restoration scheme in the area where the fly tipping happened, reinstating the Humphry Repton landscape of 1790, had put in the cameras due to a history of fly tipping on his land.

Annie Claussen-Reynolds, cabinet member for waste and environmental services, said: “Fly tipping on private land is a big issue and is a selfish act which can damage the environment. The council is determined to tackle the problem and is hoping to work more closely with landowners on projects in hot spot fly tipping areas.

“We would encourage landowners to contact us if they have fly tipping issues on their land and we can work with them to find a solution.”

Mr Gurney said: “Many landowners are suffering at the hands of fly tippers. “As well as being unsightly, this crime can cost landowners lots of money in clear up costs. If fly tipped waste isn’t cleared up, landowners can be prosecuted under illegal storage of waste legislation – which is obviously massively unfair.

“By working with the local authority in this case we managed to get a positive result which shows fly tipping will not be tolerated in North Norfolk.”

The man who was prosecuted pleaded guilty to both offences when he appeared before magistrates in Norwich on August 16. He was fined £120 for each offence, plus a victim surcharge of £30 and prosecution costs of £200 – a total of £470.

Greenbuild 2017 in call for exhibitors

Are you a business which deals in renewable technology, green energy, environmentally friendly crafts or any other type of green activity?

Or perhaps you run a farmers’ market stall, selling cakes, jams, chutneys and other tasty goods?

Then Greenbuild – Celebrating Norfolk, North Norfolk District Council’s free-to-enter annual celebration of all things sustainable, may well be right up your street.

Greenbuild’s 13th outing will be at Felbrigg Hall, on September 9 and 10. It is designed to show people how to lead a greener lifestyle in an affordable and practical way.

Tom FitzPatrick, Leader of North Norfolk District Council, said: “This is a leading event of its type for the region and mixes entertainment for the family with crucial, accessible information about leading a greener lifestyle.

“We are on the lookout for more exhibitors from the region to join those already registered for this year’s weekend, be they returning businesses or people who have never been before.

“It’s a fantastic event and a brilliant chance to find out more, whether you are exhibiting or wanting to find out more about leading a more eco-friendly lifestyle.”

There is always plenty of entertainment for the whole family, including talks and one-to-one advice from knowledgeable experts on topics ranging from retro-fitting to eco-friendly heating, food and drink stalls and children’s activities.

And the annual favourite of three bags of compost for £3, delivered to your car when you leave, will be back.

Please note all catering spaces have been booked and there is no availability.

Parking and entry to Greenbuild are free. Opening times are 10.30am-4.30pm on the 9th and 10.30am-4pm on the 10th.

For further information visit www.north-norfolk.gov.uk/greenbuild or contact Jeanette Wilson on jeanette.wilson@north-norfolk.gov.uk or 01263 513811.

Sign up now for summer holiday sports challenge

The summer holidays are on their way – what are you going to do with your time?
A full week of active, healthy fun will be on offer this summer for young people who sign up to Challenge 23.
Challenge 23 is an action packed week of sporting activity for children aged six to 14, based at Stalham Sports Centre.
For the 23rd year this summer North Norfolk District Council’s expert coaches will create a whole week of fun games, sports and activities, in the form of the ever popular Challenge Week.
Challenge 23 kicks off on Monday, August 7, and runs every day until Friday, August 10, It costs £90 per head.
The week combines a safe and welcoming environment, the chance to make friends, excellent coaching and lots of opportunities for adventure. Days run from 9am-3pm, except for Friday which is 8am-5pm.
Friday will include a trip to the Horstead Centre and include canoeing, crate stack, tower experience and team challenges.
This will be followed by an end of week presentation back at the sports centre and a party for everyone to enjoy.
Maggie Prior, cabinet member for leisure, health and wellbeing, said: “Challenge Week is a fabulous, excellent value opportunity to take exercise all week, trying out different sports, games and activities, while having a thoroughly enjoyable and fulfilling experience.
“It’s delivered by our highly talented staff who know how to combine learning new skills with lots of fun.”
There is a Challenge 23 open day in advance of the full event where you can come and meet the team, learn all about Challenge, ask questions, sign up and try out activities for free. This will be held on July 16 10am-2pm, at Stalham Sports Centre.

For further information, there is a dedicated Challenge 23 event page on Facebook, visit www.north-norfolk.gov.uk/book, call 01692 580864 or email john.hall-galley@north-norfolk.gov.uk.

Cromer’s first 60s festival totally groovy, man

Cromer’s first  60s Festival drew big crowds yesterday (Sunday April 23) to North Norfolk’s iconic Cromer Pier.

The St George’s Day celebration organised by North Norfolk District Council welcomed in excess of 3,000 visitors over the course of the day. Many came on vintage scooters and motorcycles and even more got into the spirit of the 1960s by dressing in period clothing.

Maggie Prior, cabinet member for culture said: “The success of Cromer’s 60s event really shows there’s an appetite for something new and fun along the North Norfolk coast to add to the already superb calendar of events in our area. We are definitely going to look into whether this can become a yearly event.”

The event ran from 10am-4pm and was officially opened by TV and radio presenter Helen McDermott. With vintage stalls and vehicles, a screening of the 1966 World Cup Final, live music and dance, Beatles and Thunderbirds exhibitions, food and happy hours in the Pier Bar with £1 a pint, the day was packed with fun.

Nigel Pearce, ward member for Suffield Park, Cromer, who championed the event, said: “It was amazing to see so many people having a great time while celebrating the 60s. The 60s are very special to me so being able to share some of my favourite things with other people was really great. Thanks to everyone who came along.”