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Chance to become a North Norfolk councillor

An event to help and inform prospective candidates considering standing for election at North Norfolk District Council next May will be held on September 20.

The evening is designed to:

  • Inform prospective candidates of the positive difference they can make to their communities.
  • Inform prospective candidates of the varied work of North Norfolk District Council – including housing, licensing, economic development, tourism, culture, health, environment, coast and electoral services.
  • Ensure key dates in the run up to May 2019 are understood by all prospective candidates.

The event will be held at North Norfolk District Council’s headquarters at Holt Road, Cromer, NR27 9EN, from 6.30-8.30pm.

For more information about becoming a councillor, visit north-norfolk.gov.uk/becomeacouncillor.

If you are interested in attending, please contact emma.denny@north-norfolk.gov.uk or call 01263 516010.

There will be refreshments available on the evening.

Councillor Hilary Cox

 

Applications open for Community Transport Fund

North Norfolk District Council’s Community Transport Fund is open for applications and the council will host workshop for organisations interested in applying.

The scheme is designed to support community transport schemes across the district that help vulnerable, disadvantaged and isolated residents of all ages access the services and facilities they need.

The types of project the fund is likely to support include Good Neighbours, Dial-a-Ride, MediRide, and work and study schemes.

Any voluntary organisation that currently provides or wishes to set up a community transport service in North Norfolk is encouraged to apply to the council for a grant.

Council leader John Lee said: “At a time when many authorities are cutting back on community projects, I’m absolutely delighted that because of the sound monetary policies of this council, we are able to provide these funds to assist some of our most vulnerable residents.”

A workshop for organisations interested in applying for a grant will be held at 10am on Thursday, June 7, at the council’s HQ in Holt Road, Cromer. The workshop will outline the application process and, after any grant is awarded, what is required in terms of monitoring, data collection, publicity and promotion.

Applications to the Community Transport Fund can be submitted at any time, and decisions on applications will be made in March, July and November. To be considered this July, applications need to be submitted by June 29.

For more information or to apply for a grant, visit www.north-norfolk.gov.uk and search for “community transport fund”.

To discuss a potential application or to book a place on the workshop, call the Communities Team on 01263 516173 or 01263 516248.

Volunteers and users of North Norfolk Community Bus

Apply for share of £17,500 community funding

Community groups across North Norfolk are being invited to bid for a share of a £17,500 windfall, with the latest round of funding from the Victory Housing Community Fund.

Charities, voluntary groups, community organisations and parish councils can bid for grants of up to £5,000, to be used for a wide range of purposes, including capital projects, venue hire, equipment, start-up expenses and training.

The fund, which aims to provide support for community groups which are making a difference at grassroots level in local communities, was started by Victory Housing Trust in 2008, and has so far given out a total of 134 grants totalling £368,385.

The last round of grants, in November, saw eight community groups receive grants of between £400 and £5,000, to help with projects as diverse as transforming an allotment and surrounding land into a junior ball games area, helping to employ a manager at a food bank, training volunteers to support families in their communities, and purchasing archery equipment for a Scout group.

Groups have until Monday, April 3, to submit their bids, with the decision about where the money goes being made by a panel made up of Victory Housing Trust residents, advised by the grants team at Norfolk Community Foundation, which administers the fund on behalf of Victory.

“We are delighted once again to open our community fund for grants bids,” said Victory Housing Trust chief executive John Archibald.  “In the past nine years we have supported so many fantastic community initiatives, helping those organisations which really make our communities tick at grassroots level.

“The process of applying for a grant is simple and user-friendly, and we particularly encourage bids from organisations which have not applied before.”

Applications for grants can be made by any organisation or group established for charitable purposes, provided there is a formal structure which allows for monitoring of activity and feedback – official charitable status is not necessary.  The fund is looking for applications from voluntary and community groups in the North of Norfolk whose primary aim is to improve the quality of people’s lives.

Full details of how to apply for grants from the Victory Housing Community Fund can be found at www.norfolkfoundation.com/funds/victory-housing-trust-community-fund.

 

 

 

Who deserves a Big Society award?

Do you know someone who deserves to be thanked for the work they do in the community or an organisation which deserves praise?

North Norfolk District Council is organising a Big Society Awards Night to thank the people and the projects that help to create a strong community.

The Big Society Awards Night, which has the support of North Norfolk Radio, will be held at Sheringham Little Theatre on  March 23 to celebrate the Big Society community spirit that helps to make North Norfolk such a great place to live.

People are being asked to nominate a project or a person that has made a difference in their community by January 27.

Categories open to public nomination are:

  • Community Project Award – for projects that are based in or benefit people in the district.
  • Voluntary Services Award for Sport – for someone who has made an outstanding contribution to sport in the district.
  • Voluntary Services Award for someone who has made an outstanding contribution for young people in the district.
  • Voluntary Services Award for someone who has made an outstanding contribution for older people in the district.
  • Voluntary Services Award for someone who has made an outstanding contribution to their neighbourhood.

NNDC will also be inviting projects which were awarded a Big Society Fund between 2014 – 16 to make nominations in two other categories which are:

  • Outstanding Contribution to a Big Society Funded Project – by an adult.
  • Outstanding Contribution to a Big Society Funded Project – by a young person aged under 18.

The council will also be presenting a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Tom FitzPatrick, leader of North Norfolk District Council and chairman of the Big Society Fund Panel, said: “The Big Society is all about supporting community projects and these awards are all about recognising the exceptional community spirit in our area. Everyone who contributes to their community and helps others deserves recognition and I hope people will come forward with their nominations and publically thank the people who help others.”

A Big Society Awards event was held for the first time in 2014. For this the second event, members of the public are being asked to make nominations. The project or person does not have to be connected to a Big Society Funded project.

To put forward nominations:

Community groups benefit from Worstead Festival

Schoolchildren, a community choir and its audiences, an archives group dedicated to charting the history of a Norfolk town and a group working towards updating play equipment were among those to benefit from the latest handouts from the Worstead Festival charity.

The charity has a long history of helping groups and organisations both in its villages and in neighbouring parishes.

Thanks to the small and dedicated group of volunteers who organise the July event, this year the organisation handed out grants totaling £16,000-plus at its annual meeting on December 7 at Worstead Village Hall.

The festival made a profit of around £20,000 this year, helped by good weather and 15,000-plus visitors.

Those to benefit were Worstead Primary School, The Choir Worstead, North Walsham Archives group, North Walsham Play, Worstead Guild of Weavers (for toilets at their HQ) and Scottow Church (for church heaters). Money left over will remain in the funding pot.

Chairman Simon Cole said: “The effort that goes into the festival over the course of the entire year is all worthwhile when we get to give these grants to groups who are doing so much good for their communities.

“The 2016 festival was a particularly good one, with some new ideas working well and our visitors responding very positively to the whole event.

“Plans for 2017 are well in train and we look forward to welcoming both regulars and those who have not come to see the festival before.”

Matthew Smith, from North Walsham Play, which received £2,500, said: “The very generous donation has enabled us to start putting plans together to bring about the new play park in the new year. The donation means a lot of all members of the committee and we would all like to personally thank everyone involved with organising such a well-loved and well-supported festival.”

Wayne Beauchamp, from North Walsham Archives echoed that sentiment, saying: “Thanks to the awesome Worstead Festival committee for donating £500 to our group, The North Walsham and District Community Archive, to help with our work archiving the area’s history. This will help enormously. We plan to buy storage equipment for keeping our massive collection of photos and documents safely stored, both digitally and physically, and also a new portable scanner to aid in digitising photos ‘on location’.”

The annual meeting included the election of directors for the year, with six standing again and one new member joining.

Next year’s event will be held over the weekend of July 29 and 30. Grant applications open in March and close at the end of September for the amounts to be agreed in time for the 2017 AGM at the beginning of December.

See more at www.worsteadfestival.org, check out the festival’s Facebook pages and follow @worsteadfest on Twitter.

 PICTURE CAPTION: Worstead Festival chairman Simon Cole (left) with representatives of organisations who were awarded grants (from left) Helen Kelly (Choir Worstead). Matthew Smith (North Walsham Play), Jo Read (Worstead School), Ellie Beattie (Worstead Guild of Weavers) and Wayne Beauchamp (North Walsham and District Archives).


PICTURE CAPTION: Worstead Festival chairman Simon Cole (left) with representatives of organisations who were awarded grants (from left) Helen Kelly (Choir Worstead). Matthew Smith (North Walsham Play), Jo Read (Worstead School), Ellie Beattie (Worstead Guild of Weavers) and Wayne Beauchamp (North Walsham and District Archives).

North Walsham’s young sports stars recognised at ceremony

North Walsham’s young sports stars have been recognised at a ceremony at the town’s Atrium, as North Walsham High School’s annual sports presentation evening acknowledged the school’s high achievers of 2016.

Lauren Hemp and Luke Everson shared the annual Sports Personality of the Year Award, given to the outstanding sports contributor in the year group which left in the summer.

Meanwhile the prestigious Graeme Wilton Award for Sporting Excellence went to Year 11 student Ethan Davies.  Katie Lince received a Service to PE award, with Mariusz Liszynski receiving an Outstanding Endeavour Award.

Three school sports teams were also recognised: the U14 and U16 Rounders teams, which both won their respective North Norfolk Leagues, and the U16 Girls Football team, which was runner-up in the County Cup.

The prizes were handed out by former NWHS student Josh Roper, who has gone on to become a Norfolk FA Ambassador, a participant in the FA’s Football Futures programme, and a recipient of an FA Outstanding Contribution to Football award.

Josh told students that there was no reason why they couldn’t live their dream in sport, telling them: “Sport is unique. The impact that it has on people is different from anything else. It is not just being the best sports person. It is about developing so many different skills, such as leadership, communication, and the ability to change lives.

“My biggest advice would be to take any opportunity that comes your way, even if it is just voluntary; you never know just how far picking up cones could take you – for me it was to Chicago!”

School head of PE Paul Bradshaw said: “These awards are a chance to recognise publicly the many sporting achievements of our students during the past 12 months.  Sport remains very strong at the school, and it is important to acknowledge the hard work and dedication of our students.

“We have seen students competing at the very highest level during the year, including at international level.  But these awards are about recognising excellence at every level in both individual and team sports.

“Sport can play such an important role for young people, not just in encouraging physical fitness and healthy living, but also in fostering a sense of teamwork, challenge and achievement which will benefit them way beyond the sports field and into their future lives.”

Picture: ANDY NEWMAN

Picture Attached: Joint winners of the NWHS Sports Personality of the Year Award Luke Everson (left) and Lauren Hemp, with guest speaker and former NWHS student Josh Roper (centre) (photo: Andy Newman)

Joint winners of the NWHS Sports Personality of the Year Award Luke Everson (left) and Lauren Hemp, with guest speaker and former NWHS student Josh Roper (centre).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hazel on a mission to help

HAZEL NEEDHAM, a former student of Aylsham High and Paston Sixth Form College talks about her summer plans in Fiji and how they are not about getting a sun tan but helping the community there.

hazel

Having grown up just outside Aylsham, attended the local schools and then North Walsham’s Paston Sixth Form College, I have been blessed with a childhood of not only safety and security, but also opportunities.
A former footballer, Girl Guide and keen thespian and writer I have always loved getting involved with our little community and have a lot of people to thank for where I am now, studying English and creative writing at the University of Warwick.
We are told it constantly, but the reason I am reviewing my own childhood and community is a reflection of quite how lucky we are.
In July 2017, I am flying halfway across the world to Fiji – and not for a sun tan. The country has a history infused with devastating cyclones, or storms, which even in February 2016 forced an astonishing 62,400 people out of their homes.
Think Pacific is a small but crucial charity which sends at least 20 volunteers each month into different villages of Fiji to help restore the poverty-stricken communities.
I will be one of these volunteers, living with a Fijian family and each day working with the locals to address an array of necessities.
As a student and a proud geek myself, I am particularly enthused by the educational focus. Each morning I will work with teachers and students to regenerate a safe learning environment for the Fijian children, including maths and English and general support.
In the afternoons, the focus will be more on extra-curricular activities, which are currently nonexistent, specifically sports, drama and enterprise, all arguably the most memorable and enjoyable parts of a school experience.
To reiterate, however, the underlying significance of these activities is to re-establish a sense of safety, support and community into the lives of the children and their families.
Aside from education, the charity also runs building and refurbishment projects. They have built community kitchens, installed water sanitation systems, created a kindergarten and built jetties, all to provide a small helping hand in improving the current absence of basic infrastructure.
Think Pacific also looks to conservation, investing in sea defences and ways of helping the wildlife which is also severely damaged by each cyclone.
Therefore, the childhood I have been blessed with of safety, security and opportunities is one that I not only fully appreciate, but one I believe everyone should be entitled to.
Obviously, with natural disasters constantly knocking at your door and more than 250,000 members of the population below the poverty line, this cannot be achieved without, firstly, financial support, but, secondly, dedication, hard work and empathy from those of us who can recognise how lucky we are and how much they need our help.
I aim to raise £1,500 before I leave in July, though every copper is counted and appreciated by the orphans and families that need our support, and donations are appreciated in any quantity.
If you would like to support the cause, and my month of cold showers and plain rice please find my Just Giving page https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/hazel-needham.

Bid for a share of £17,500 community cash

Community groups across North Norfolk are being invited to bid for a share of a £17,500 windfall, with the latest round of funding from the Victory Housing Community Fund.

Charities, voluntary groups, community organisations and parish councils can bid for grants of up to £5,000, to be used for a wide range of purposes, including capital projects, venue hire, equipment, start-up expenses and training.

The fund, which aims to provide support for community groups which are making a difference at grassroots level in local communities, was started by Victory Housing Trust in 2008, and has so far given out a total of 126 grants totalling £347,035.

Groups have until Friday, September 30, to submit their bids, with the decision about where the money goes being made by a panel made up of Victory Housing Trust residents, advised by the grants team at Norfolk Community Foundation, which administers the fund on behalf of Victory.

“We are delighted once again to open our community fund for grants bids,” said Victory Housing Trust chief executive John Archibald.  “In the past eight years we have supported so many fantastic community initiatives, helping those organisations which really make our communities tick at grassroots level. The process of applying for a grant is simple and user-friendly, and we particularly encourage bids from organisations which have not applied before.”

Applications for grants can be made by any organisation or group established for charitable purposes, provided there is a formal structure which allows for monitoring of activity and feedback – official charitable status is not necessary.  The fund is looking for applications from voluntary and community groups in the north of Norfolk whose primary aim is to improve the quality of people’s lives.

Full details of how to apply for grants from the Victory Housing Community Fund can be found at www.norfolkfoundation.com/funds/victory-housing-trust-community-fund

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