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Police aware of Aylsham travellers’ encampment

Norfolk Police are working towards serving a civil notice on travellers who have set up camp at Aylsham Lodge Hotel.
A spokesman said police were aware of a traveller encampment and were working with partners, the landowner and their representatives.
Officers will continue to monitor the situation, but are satisfied that no criminal activity has taken place at this stage.
About five vehicles, including caravans, were reported in the car park of the hotel, which closed late last year.
A spokesman from Broadland District Council said they were making efforts to contact the owners of the site because it is private property.

Aylsham councillor steps down after a decade

Aylsham will be looking for a new member on Broadland District Council as councillor Ian Graham (pictured) steps down after more than 10 years representing the ward.

Mr Graham has decided to dedicate more time to a charity he has been supporting for many years following the sad loss of his wife last summer.

In his resignation letter Mr Graham said how much he had enjoyed his work representing Aylsham and on the committees at Broadland but felt he couldn’t continue to support constituents in Aylsham as he would like alongside his charity work.

Councillor Andrew Proctor, leader of Broadland District Council said: “Ian was a dedicated member of the council with a great commitment to Aylsham and its residents.

“I know that he was most proud of his leading role in the development of Forward Court, staffed by the Benjamin Foundation, which provides a safe space for homeless youngsters to gain the life skills they need for a new start in life.”

Mr Graham will continue to develop his work supporting children with special needs through Mnarani Aid in Kenya and through Rotary International which is helping to provide secondary education to needy children in the country.

An election for a replacement will be held on May 24, with nomination papers due at Broadland District Council between April 19 and 26, by 4pm.


Broadland householders facing council tax rise

 

Councillors at Broadland District Council have agreed a 4.3pc council tax rise, the equivalent of an extra £4.99 per year for an average Band D property.

Earlier this month Norfolk County Council agreed a 5.99pc rise in its share of council tax and a 5.5pc budget increase has also been approved for policing in the county during 2018-2019.

Broadland also increased its share of the council tax last year, following a  seven-year freeze.

“No one wants to see a rise in council tax. However, it is important that we are able to help those most in need and continue to maintain high quality services,” said councillor Trudy Mancini-Boyle, Broadland’s portfolio holder for finance. “We have restricted our increase to £4.99 in order to achieve this, although I appreciate that residents will see a rise in other aspects of their bill.” 

The council will continue to look for other sources of income and, following the success of the Carrowbreck Meadow development, has recently secured help from central government for a new housing development in Great Plumstead through its company, Broadland Growth Ltd.

For the second year, residents will be receiving a Buy in Broadland discount voucher booklet with their council tax bills. Designed to support local business, the voucher booklet will provide residents with 96 different discounts and offers for Broadland businesses, giving them the chance to discover new places to enjoy and perhaps rediscover some old favourites.

The council tax rise will be included in bills for 2018/19 which residents will be receiving in the coming weeks.

 


 

Fascinating photos from Hellesdon past

Fascinating glimpses into Hellesdon’s past can be seen in these photographs from Tony Adams’ family album.

Tony, of Reepham Road, a Broadland District Councillor for Hellesdon South East and a member of Norfolk County Council, has lived in the parish since moving as a little boy with his family from Exeter in 1947.

Many of the places he was familiar with during his childhood are now lost under housing estates.

CORONATION TEA: This party scene was taken in June 1953 at a children’s tea celebrating the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. The venue was the old Firs Stadium, famed for its speedway racing. It’s been replaced by homes on Meadow Way and Meadow Close. Do you recognise any of the faces?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOUNDARY STADIUM: In the following photo, Tony and his older brother Geoffrey are pictured behind their home on City View Road with the Boundary Greyhound Stadium in the background.

Tony remembers that there was a football pitch in the stadium where he used to go and watch Norwich City’s B team play.

The area behind his home was completely open space where children would throw down a couple of coats to mark goal and play their own football matches.

That open land is now Coronation Road, Coronation Close and Sceptre Close.

 

 

 

 

 

CITY VIEW ROAD: City View Road pictured in the early 1960s:

 

 

 

 

 

 

AIRMEN’S BARRACKS: Once airmen’s barracks for men stationed at RAF Horsham St Faith, these Fifers Lane buildings were used from the 1960s onwards as accommodation for UEA students. They’ve since been redeveloped with housing.

  • If you’ve got old photos and/or memories of Hellesdon and don’t mind sharing them with fellow residents, please email them to news@justregional.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hellesdon’s winning housing on Channel 4 today

A ground-breaking housing development in Hellesdon is featuring tonight (Tuesday November 21) on Channel 4’s Grand Designs House of the Year.

Carrowbreck Meadow, a Passivhaus development in Hellesdon, can be seen as part of the programme which airs at 9pm.

The programme was interested in the development for its architecture, its energy-efficient qualities and also for its affordable homes, which make up 43pc of the site which includes two, three and four-bedroomed family homes in a woodland setting. Carrowbreck Meadow, was masterminded by Broadland Growth Ltd – a partnership between Broadland District Council and Norfolk County Council’s NPS Group. It was created to offer carefully- planned, affordable, high-quality developments in Broadland, while maintaining the highest public-sector values.

The Hellesdon homes have won a host of awards, including the RIBA East Award 2017.

Councillor Andrew Proctor, leader of Broadland District Council and chairman of Broadland Growth Ltd, said: “Carrowbreck Meadow is an exciting development which raises the bar for local authorities in the delivery of housing.

“We are making a difference to our communities, while offering something different to the marketplace and meeting the demand for housing in Broadland. This also creates significant social value for our district.”

Richard Gawthorpe, Director of Broadland Growth Ltd, said: “A key aim of the Carrowbreck Scheme was to create a positive intervention in the marketplace by providing more affordable mixed tenure housing and creating homes and lifestyle choices, not just houses. “These dwellings are built to nationally recognised space standards and are places that people choose to live in due to the comfortable conditions created by their highly sustainable Passivhaus design.” ​Sarah Lewis, Carrowbreck Meadow project architect from Hamson Barron Smith, said: “These homes are at the leading edge of low energy design, joining a small elite group of super low energy Passivhaus projects across the UK and act as exemplars for future development in the area and beyond.The provision of affordable housing for the local community which exceeds planning requirements and is truly tenure blind demonstrates the inclusive nature of the development which will help to achieve a sustainable, energy efficient and a mixed community.”
 Awards already won by Carrowbreck Meadow: 

National RTPI awards – national award category Excellence in planning to deliver housing

RTPI Awards (East of England) – East of England Award for Planning Excellence 2017

RIBA McEwen awards – shortlisted in final 12

RIBA National – won one of 47 national awards

RIBA Awards – East of England – won RIBA East project award

Norfolk and Norwich Eco-awards – Highly commended in best eco-house category

Norfolk Design and Craftmanship Awards 2017 – best ‘new residential’

RICS Award (residential category) – awarded ‘highly commended’

SPACES (Society for public architecture, construction, Engineering and Surveying) –Been shortlisted from 110 submissions down to 18 finalists

National Housing Design Awards 2017 – DEFRA Award for rural housing

LABC East Anglia Building Excellence Awards – best new housing development in East Anglia and shortlisted for national awards

Norfolk Constructing Excellence Awards – Norfolk Constructing Excellence Club Award for Excellence and Project of the Year

Passivhaus Trust Awards – entry submitted for 2018 awards

Housebuilders Awards 2017 – shortlisted in Best Sustainable Scheme and Best Design for three storeys or fewer

Inside Housing (top 60 developments) – submissions in the Partnerships category, Best Residential Development and Best Architectural Design

Building Awards 2017 – shortlisted under Housing Project of the Year

24 Housing Awards – shortlisted for Best Green Scheme

Energy Awards – shortlisted for Residential Building Award

AJ Architecture Awards – shortlisted for Housing Project of the Year

AJ Footprint Award for Sustainability – submitted

RIBA Regional RSAW – submitted

Civic Trust Awards – submitted

Andrew Proctor, leader of Broadland District Council, is pictured during filming for tonight’s show.


Aylsham to host national Repton celebrations

Aylsham will host the official launch of Repton 200 – a year of nationwide celebrations coordinated by the Gardens Trust marking the bicentenary of the death of Humphry Repton, who succeeded Capability Brown as Britain’s greatest landscape gardener.

Norfolk is where Repton first worked as a landscape gardener, at Catton Park and Sheringham Park, and where he was buried, at Aylsham Parish Church, in March 1818.

To mark the bicentenary of his death, a programme of events celebrating his life and work have been planned in Norfolk and around the country.

Humphry Repton, whose works include Tatton Park and Woburn Abbey, was the successor to Capability Brown and the first to coin the term ‘landscape gardening’.

Born in Bury St Edmunds in April 1752, he attended Norwich Grammar School and trained to work in the textile business but was not successful in the industry.

After trying his hand at a number of careers, including dramatist, artist, journalist and secretary, Repton set himself up as a landscape gardener, and gained work through his social contacts.

He knew Sheringham well, having lived in Sustead, three miles away, for 12 years.

Repton went on to work on estates across the country, producing his famous Red Books which showed his clients ‘before’ and ‘after’ views of how he would improve their land.

The Gardens Trust are co-ordinating the national celebrations, which start in March 2018, and include the Repton Season organised by Aylsham and District Team Ministry, Aylsham Town Council, community groups and Broadland District Council.

Events in Norfolk include a history workshop with Dr Tom Williamson, professor of landscape history and archaeology at the University of East Anglia, a Repton 200 Memorial Choral Evensong, a Humphry Repton Memorial Lecture with Professor Stephen Daniels of the University of Nottingham and a Red Book competition involving pupils from local schools.

Councillor Karen Vincent, member champion for heritage at Broadland District Council, said: “We are lucky as a district to have links to such an important and fascinating figure.

“Repton’s work remains on show throughout the country, with his first work being here in Broadland at Catton Park.  “We would encourage anyone interested in one of the country’s most important landscape gardeners to come and help us celebrate his achievements in the spring.”

Dr James Bartos, chairman of the Gardens Trust, said: “Humphry Repton designed around 400 landscapes across the country, many of which remain much-loved historic gardens.

“His picturesque designs featured terraces, gravel walks and flower beds around the house, as well as themed flower gardens.

“Next year will see a host of events celebrating his enduring influence, and drawing attention to gardens which need help to survive.”

To find out more about events in Norfolk for the Repton Season, visit www.humphryrepton.org.uk or follow #Repton200 on Twitter.

Picture: Humphry Repton’s tomb at Aylsham Parish Church

Sprowston woodland wins biodiversity award

A popular area of woodland in Sprowston has won an award for its biodiversity.

Harrison’s Wood, which borders Blue Boar Lane and Salhouse Road, was opened to the public in May and was given the award by the Norfolk Biodiversity Partnership.

Accepting the award, town council chairman Ian Moncur said there were big plans in store for the plot, saying: “This is just the start.

“We intend to increase involvement of community groups so that we can manage the woodland and realise our ambitions which include the bridging over of the existing ditch, provision of a car park and maintaining and improving the habitats of the woodland as a priority for conservation.” Public access to the 27-hectares of mixed woodland was made possible through a partnership of the town council with Broadland District Council and the Norwich Fringe Project.

The wood features a network of paths through mixed evergreen and broadleaf trees including oak, rowan, silver birch and scots pine and is home to birds such as chiffchaffs, treecreepers and great spotted woodpeckers.

David Willmott, Broadland District Council’s member champion for community engagement, added: “This is a great project and we were pleased to work with our partners to create a community asset which we hope residents will enjoy for generations to come.”

 


 

Hellesdon children get hands-on with rubbish

Children from Kinsale Infant School recently got hands-on with rubbish, in a session designed to help them learn about recycling.
Waste and recycling officers from Broadland District Council visited the school in Hellesdon to talk about what happens to our rubbish after we put it in the bin. And 50 Year 2 children found out what you can and can’t recycle, where they had to separate a mix of correct and incorrect items into recycling and rubbish bins during a practical sorting exercise.
The children found out that that items for recycling need to be clean (without food or liquid remains), loose (not in bags) and correct (accepted for recycling by the council). They looked at items such as envelopes, foil and clean plastic trays, which can all be recycled, and crisp packets, sweet wrappers and plastic food wrapping which need to be placed in the general waste bin.
They also learned about where both rubbish and recycling goes once it leaves our homes, and how it is better for the environment to reuse and recycle where possible.
The children were given quiz sheets to take home, with activities and games to test their new knowledge, and the chance to win a prize of a recycled stationery set if they complete the worksheets.
Lesly-Ann Coughlan, class teacher at Kinsale Infant School, said: “This was an informative session and the children took a lot of new knowledge home about the type of things that can and cannot be recycled.”
John Fisher, Broadland District Council’s portfolio holder for environmental excellence, said: “It’s great to see schoolchildren getting involved in something as fundamental as recycling. We hope that they’ll become recycling champions and encourage their families to recycle correctly at home.”
Find out what you can and cannot recycle in Broadland at www.broadland.gov.uk/recycling

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