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DJ Sara Cox joins the race on Ladies’ Night

Radio 2 and BBC TV presenter Sara Cox, a keen amateur horse rider as well as a professional DJ, is hosting a night of music at the seaside course’s July 19, Ladies’ Night.

Racecourse executive director Glenn Tubby said: “Ladies’ Night is always a special event in our summer calendar but Sara’s dance music will really be the icing on the cake. We are hoping fans of 80s music will turn out in force to enjoy their favourite sounds after an evening of racing action.”

Sara, a farmer’s daughter from Bolton, is well known for her festival DJ-ing as well as for her Sounds of the 80s show on BBC Radio 2 and also now for her live 24-hour danceathon which raised more than £800,000 for Comic Relief in March.

But she is also an equestrian sports fan. Sara has ridden in charity races at Goodwood and beat top jockey Frankie Dettori – a regular rider at Great Yarmouth – in a training ride ahead of the QIPCO British Champions Day at Ascot.

Sara took part in a fun showjumping competition, Only Fools on Horses, for BBC Sport Relief in 2006. Now fully recovered, four years ago she broke a collar bone in a riding accident.

At Great Yarmouth Racecourse she will DJ after an evening of flat racing and play a set featuring dance-driven music ranging from the 80s up to today’s chart hits.

Sara said: “I’m really looking forward to my visit to Great Yarmouth racecourse. I’ll hopefully get to see some magnificent race horses before getting the Ladies’ Night crowd dancing with tracks from some of my favourite bands and artists from the 80s. Who doesn’t like 80s music? It was the soundtrack to my generation, with classic songs from music legends.”

Tickets and packages (£16-£34, with group discounts for 15 or more) and information available at www.greatyarmouth-racecourse.co.uk or call 01493 842527.

It’s all quiet for North Walsham pub plans

Ssshh, there are plans for a new micropub in North Walsham.

The concept for the former taxi office at 2 Market Place shuns all forms of electronic entertainment with the idea to “keep it simple”.

The application to North Norfolk District Council is for a change of use of the empty building to drinking establishment.

The micropub will sell cask ale on gravity from the barrel, also real cider and limited bottled beer, mostly speciality foreign beers, plus serve traditional pub snacks.

There will be no TV, fruit machines or recorded music and as such little noise, other than conversation. The plan is to steer clear of lager and alcopops and also not brew beer on site.

The application sates: “The Market Street Tap will be a throwback to the traditional ale houses of the mid-19th century. It will be a single room micropub with limited space (room for approximately 25-30 people) and limited opening hours.”

The business will be based primarily on three core themes – local cask ales served straight from cask to glass; traditional snacks such as pork pies, scotch eggs, crisps and cheeses sourced from local artisan businesses; conversation between locals and tourists alike.

It is not intended that there will be any structural changes to the property, inside or out, other than hanging pictures on the walls

The application says: “A micropub is a small freehouse which listens to its customers, mainly serves cask ales and promotes the art of conversation.”

The first micropub opened in 2005 in Herne Bay, Kent and since then the concept has gone from strength to strength.

There are currently more than 280 micropubs listed with the Micropub Association and news of further openings continues to buck the recent trend of pub closures.

Angels beat rivals Aylsham to take local pride

Last night in front of a huge crowd North Walsham ran out 3-1 winners against Aylsham.

The Angels were in control for most of the game with their pacey wingers causing problems to the Aylsham back four, once they got ahead Aylsham were always facing an uphill battle, one that became even harder after they received two red cards.

Angels chairman Alex Brady said, “What a win last night for North Walsham. From the first minute to the 90th, every single member of the management team and playing staff battled and fought to ensure the 3 points stayed at Greens Road, with the goals coming from Matty Downing (2) and Liam Clarke.

Credit has to go to Aylsham for bringing over 100 fans, and with the overall crowd in excess of 300 it was a brilliant occasion with lots of friendly banter between the two sets of fans.

A special mention has to go to the referee for controlling the game well in the tough conditions – and he certainly played his part in a very entertaining game.

With crowd numbers at record levels in 2017, it certainly serves as a reminder that football is alive and well within the town, and that improved facilities should continue to remain the aim for the club and the town”

It was in stark contrast to the Aylsham camp whose promotion push has slipped away in recent weeks, manager Martin Meek said, “We were all gutted and disappointed in the changing room after the game, we let ourselves and the fans down. But fair play to North Walsham who were the better team on the night.”

PICTURES: HSR PHOTOGRPAHY

North Walsham students enjoy gig by rising star

Singer-songwriter brings show with online safety message to school.

300 North Walsham school students enjoyed a concert by an up and coming singer-songwriter at the school’s Atrium.

Essex-born Tom Ryder performed a number of songs including his new single ‘Here We Go Again’, as well as sharing his own experiences of cyber bullying and exam pressures.

The 27-year-old described how the pressure to perform during his own schooldays led to bouts of insomnia, anxiety and depression.

He advised students to confide in parents teachers or friends if something was worrying them. “You need to talk to someone about it. If you keep it within yourself, it will just grow,” he said.

Tom also shared a number of tips and strategies about staying safe online and avoiding cyber bullying, which he defines as using the internet to make people feel uncomfortable or threatened. He called on victims of such bullying not to respond or believe in what was being said about them, and to feel confident in who they are.

“The internet and social media are great things; if I want to say something, I can get it out there,” he told the audience. “But as soon as you put something up, it is out there. So before you share, make sure it’s something that you’re happy for people to see.”

The performance is part of a schools tour being undertaken by Tom to assure young people that anything is possible and that they need to not only work hard but also enjoy their time at school, rather than fearing it and being worried about the outcome of exams.

He described NWHS’s Atrium auditorium as “the nicest room I’ve played in so far in schools.”

Tom Ryder performing at The Atrium at North Walsham High School

Arts North Norfolk charity to close

Arts North Norfolk is to close the charity, it was announced today.

A statement from the trustees of The Atrium North Norfolk Ltd (Arts North Norfolk issued today said: “On Wednesday, February 23, at an extraordinary general meeting the company members present voted unanimously to close the charity.

“It was with great sadness that we, the company directors (trustees), determined this to be our only viable and appropriate course of action given the financial and organisational uncertainty and outlook. The decision was taken in accordance with the procedures set out in our Articles of Association. It was not taken lightly and is binding.”
The move has come after a turbulent time for the charity following the resignation of CEO Joseph Ballard in September 2016.

The trustees said in the statement: “We have worked extremely hard to sustain the charity in difficult circumstances with increasingly limited financial and human resources. The enormity of the task has been overwhelming – both emotionally and practically – and the obstacles are now, in our considered opinion, insurmountable.”

There have been calls for the collective resignation of trustees. “Our response is that, with the charity in such financial crisis, we would have been (and would continue to be) in serious breach of our responsibilities to do so at any point since the AGM in December 2016, when we were (re)elected by a very solid majority,” the statement reported.

It went on: “We firmly believe that we have acted with complete integrity to perform our prescribed obligations as trustees and have remained utterly committed throughout to the fulfillment of ANN’s core charitable purposes. We have endeavoured to deliver on promises made; but we know that we have not always done so. To those people that we have let down, we extend our sincere apologies. We have, with the invaluable help of a few dedicated volunteers, tried our very best to maintain a programme of theatre and concerts at The Atrium.”

ANN has not held a Licence to Occupy The Atrium since January 2016 and thus has had no direct involvement in the management or hiring of the facilities since that time. As such, all booking enquiries should continue to be sent direct to lettings@nwhs.uk.

They thanked the school governors for their support and Suzie Sharpe, who manages bookings.
There are currently hopes to continue and develop the Atrium Cinema Club.

The closure of the charity could take up to six months. Once all our bills are paid, trustees will have to dispose of any remaining assets (cash and physical) in accordance with the Articles of Association i.e. to registered charities with the same or similar charitable objects.

“We are committed to finding the most efficient way to ensure that these assets remain for the continuation of The Atrium Cinema Club and for the development and delivery of arts and educational activities and events for the benefit of the communities of North Walsham and North Norfolk. The charity is closing but the work will live on,” said the statement.

Trustees chairman Katrina Cole said: “We have tried to continue with a very restricted and limited programme because that was all we had available in front of us. We have no money to programme for the future as there are no grants or other funds in place or applied for so we are in a completely untenable situation.”
The organisation had been waiting for the final payment of a grant from Arts Council England of around £7,000 which has already been spent on North Walsham Festival 2016.

Katrina added: “To find myself in a position where I am overseeing the closure of such a historically vibrant and achieving charity is an absolute tragedy but regrettably we are left with no choice. I am so sad and so very aggrieved that this should have come to being.”

Six months in and they still mean business

Norfolk business support organisation, Genix will celebrate six months of hosting its monthly business networking event, Coffee Means Business, in March.

Held at various locations across North Norfolk the event was established in September 2016 and was commissioned by North Norfolk District Council. It attracts more than 30 businesses who network informally over coffee.

The next Coffee Means Business will take place on Friday, March 24,  on the first floor of The Prince of Wales Stand, Fakenham Racecourse, 9.30am-11.30am and the speakers will include Gin Wilson-North (pictured) of Walk and Glamp providing stress-free walking and glamping holidays around the whole coast of Norfolk.

Gary Parker, who hosts Coffee Means Business said, “We’re extremely pleased to be celebrating six months of Coffee Means Business, Norfolk.  The feedback we’ve had from attendees has been extremely positive, businesses appreciate meeting different people every month, and they enjoy the informality, friendliness and low cost which we’ve maintained at just £2 per person, with no membership or joining fees.”

Nigel Dixon, from North Norfolk District Council, said: “We’re extremely pleased to have commissioned Coffee Means Business as a way to support freelancers, self-employed, business owners and companies alike. It’s a great format to meet new business people, build professional relationships and expand your client base.”

Genix is a not-for-profit organisation which has been supporting businesses for more than 20 years with business skills masterclasses, advice and events.

For more details of Coffee Means Business go to www.genix.org.uk or phone 0800 096 3013.

New head for North Walsham school

St Nicholas House Prep School in North Walsham has welcomed a new head to take the school into the future.

Philip Oldroyd has taken over the helm of the independent school and is “looking forward to leading St Nicholas House into its next exciting phase of growth and development”. The appointment comes after headmaster Martin Castle decided to leave his position to enable the school to move forward to the next phase of its life.

Philip lives in Horstead with his wife, Niki and two sons, Dan (17) and Tom (19). The family moved to Norfolk from Sevenoaks, in Kent, six years ago to be closer to Niki’s parents. Philip is a graduate of Leeds University with a BA in PE and business studies and gained his PGCE from the University of Surrey.

His career in education has spanned 28 years, 10 of which as a head eacher. He successfully led Sevenoaks Prep, a co-educational school for children from nursery to Year 8, for seven years and more recently, was headmaster of Langley Prep School. Under his leadership both schools flourished, growing in both numbers and reputation.

Currently, Philip is head of the lower school at Langley, in Loddon, where he has the responsibility for both the pastoral and academic education of the children in Years 6 to 9.

Outside of school, Philip enjoys sports coaching and spectating, having “hung up his boots” a few years ago.  He has coached at both Sevenoaks and North Walsham Rugby Clubs for the past 12 years and cricket for Otford CC until his move to Norfolk.

“I am very excited to be joining such a fantastic school,” he said. “The children clearly benefit from being members of a small community and the family feel of the school is evident Small class sizes allow for more individual attention from well qualified staff who spend quality time with every child.”

There’s a chance to meet the new head at the school’s open day on Saturday, March 18.

New website to support care recruitment campaign

Norfolk County Council has launched a new website to support its Social Care Recruitment Campaign.
The purpose of the campaign is to encourage more people to work in social care across Norfolk by creating a central digital platform. The new website: www.norfolkcarecareers.co.uk will share stories and experiences from people working in the sector, answer any questions potential candidates may have and promote the opportunities available in Norfolk.

Norfolk has seen a growth in population, and with people living longer and those with disabilities more likely to survive to an older age, there is a bigger demand in homecare services.

To spread the word about how rewarding a career in caring can be, Norfolk County Council’s Recruitment and Retention Project Lead for the campaign, has teamed up with local care providers throughout Norfolk to promote working in the sector. Events will be taking place throughout March – details are posted on the new website: www.norfolkcarecareers.co.uk and on the campaign’s Twitter feed @NorfolkCareJobs and Facebook page, Norfolk Care Jobs.

Sarah Thompson, who runs Extra Care Home Services in North Walsham, is giving her full support to the campaign. “We have recently celebrated 10 years in delivering home care and it is becoming increasingly difficult to recruit people into the sector and I want to show people how rewarding a career in care can be,” she said.

Sarah nominated her deputy manager, Alex Marks (pictured), 20, for an award at the Norfolk Care Awards as she saw her potential. “Alex has a passion for doing what she does with us, her commitment shines through and her empathy for others.” Alex was the recipient of an award in the Rising Star category.

James Bullion, Norfolk County Council’s executive director of Adult Social Services said: “We must support the social care staff in their daily work, and promote good services. In these days of many negative headlines, promoting positive images of care work will help us to attract more people to fill our vacancies.

“This partnership working approach to develop the Norfolk Care Careers website will help to meet the needs of care recruitment for the challenges ahead.”

Norfolk County Council’s chair of the Adult Social Care Committee Bill Borrett said: “I am delighted that we are finding new ways to tackle recruitment issues in the care sector. The Norfolk Care Careers website is a great opportunity for signposting people to the right information and for advertising vacancies across Norfolk on behalf of our care providers.  I would urge people to visit the site to take advantage of the many events that are taking place across the county this month.”