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Toy fair coming to Hellesdon

Lego, Star Wars, Transformers, Pokemon, comics and merchandise from popular TV, film and video-game franchises will be among items on sale in Hellesdon next month.

The Norwich Vintage and Modern Toy Fair is preparing for its 11th show and has found a home at Hellesdon Community Centre. The fair will be there on Sunday September 2 from 9.30am (various entry fees apply).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aylsham in Bloom traders’ prizes announced

Tubs and baskets spilling over with colourful blooms have earned the Unicorn pub top prize in Aylsham in Bloom’s 2018 traders’ competition.

It’s a second triumph for the Hungate Street pub, which also won the Outstanding Floral Display plaque in 2016.

The impressive displays, set against the pink pub walls, are the work of Sue and Will Frazer who run the Unicorn.

There were 35 entries for the competition and Richard’s Hair Design, on Blofield Loke, was runner-up. Judge Steven Downes congratulated the winners on their wide variety of plants and the fact that they had  kept displays well watered and dead-headed.

He asked that The Dog Stop and Broadland Consultants should receive highly commended certificates.

Coxfords butcher, on Market Place, won the Inside Out prize, with Bonds Chip Shop, on Red Lion Street, as runners up. Highly commended certificates went to Budgens and the Aylsham and District Ex-Servicemen’s Social Club.

Wendy Sadler, chairman of Aylsham in Bloom, praised all those who had entered the competition.

“The colours and vibrancy, plus the wittiness of some displays, benefit the town’s appearance and make people smile,” she added.

Anglia in Bloom judges visited the town last month and the town will hear in September whether it has won a prize in the regional competition.

 

 

Shirree Russell, who works at The Unicorn, with some of the pub’s floral displays.

 

 

 

 

 

New Norwich restaurant open for business

The Ivy Collection has announced that reservation lines are now open for The Ivy Norwich Brasserie, opening on Tuesday, 21 August.

To celebrate the announcement, The Ivy Norwich Brasserie team enjoyed a toast with the Lord Mayor of Norwich, Cllr Martin Schmierer and the Sheriff of Norwich, Ros Brown outside the restaurant. Team members including General Manager, Katie Miller and Head Chef, Andrius Buinickas, were joined by waiting staff to celebrate in the heart of the city.

Situated on London Street, The Ivy Norwich Brasserie will offer an elegant dining destination in the heart of Norwich’s bustling city centre. Open seven days a week and featuring extensive all-day menus and a beautiful bar, the brasserie will offer sophisticated yet relaxed all-day dining for locals and visitors alike. The brasserie will accommodate for up to 149 guests across the main restaurant, bar and terrace, and will hold back a number of tables each day for walk-ins, allowing locals to drop-in at any time of day.

The Ivy Norwich Brasserie will feature eye-catching yet refined interiors designed by the acclaimed Martin Brudnizki Design Studio, with the brasserie’s signature green colour palette sitting against striking leather banquettes, polished marble floors and bronzed antiques.

REVIEW: Don’t Dress for Dinner, Sheringham Rep

The Summer Rep season at Sheringham Little Theatre is always a delight of treats throughout August and this year is no exception.

Don’t Dress for Dinner launched the summer season at Sheringham Little Theatre on Thursday, July 26, and shows now run until September 5.

Set in the French countryside two hours from Paris, Don’t Derss for Dinner is a fast-moving, hilarious, typical farce, full of double meanings, mistaken identities and amorous intentions. The story centres on a married couple and a weekend where they are both intending to spend the time with their respective lovers, unknown to each others.

Into the mix comes the cook, Suzette (Lauren Verrier), whom Bernard (Steve Banks) has employed for the evening while he is entertaining his lover Suzanne (Sarah Langton). His wife, Jaqueline (Naomi Bullock), was meant to be visiting her mother but was secretly spending time with her lover, Robert (Matt Jamie). Plans go awry and they all end up in the same house trying to keep their respective secrets, which results in hilarious confusion and sharp banter.

A very entertaining and fun evening which the audience enjoyed and appreciated. If you have missed this production there are more to come from the rep company at Sheringham Little Theatre.

Kevin and Sandra Stone

 

 

 

Eaton slip-way closure under way

Eaton slip road, leading from Newmarket Road into the village, closed on July 25 as the next phase of Transport for Norwich’s (TfN) work in the village got under way.

A TfN spokesman said transport improvements and essential maintenance started at the beginning of the month, with the latest phase seeing the widening of the cycle path from the Cellar House pub to Newmarket Road, allowing for two-way cycling.

Other changes taking place included simplified crossings for pedestrians as well as work to the crossroads at the centre of the village to upgrade the traffic signals, improve the junction’s efficiency and carry out resurfacing.

Councillor John Fisher, Norfolk County Council’s chair of Norwich highways agency committee, said: “This project is designed to improve traffic flow for all road users, marking a positive and lasting change for transport facilities in the area.

“Construction has been planned to minimise disruption as much as possible, with the slip road closure taking place in the school holidays and manually controlled traffic signals used at the busiest times of day. We would like to thank everyone affected for their patience while we carry out this work.”

The closure is due to be in place until the end of August but TfN said every effort would be made to open the road as soon as possible.

First and Konectbus services are affected and details of the temporary changes and relocated bus stops are available on notices in the area and at www.norfolk.gov.uk/eatoncringleford, where you can also find general traffic management and project information.

Phase one of the project in Cringleford, which was built last summer, saw traffic signals installed either side of Cringleford Road bridge to help manage queuing and improve traffic flow.


 

FREE home-grown veg and herbs in Sprowston

Free herbs and vegetables will be on offer in Sprowston later this summer thanks to young gardeners helping with Sprowston’s Grow Your Community greenhouse project, supported by Broadland District Council.

The young volunteers, members of the Sprowston Youth Engagement Project (SYEP), have made a raised bed beside the road at the project’s base, the Sprowston Community Hub, on Aslake Close.

Once the plants have matured, members of the public will be welcome to help themselves, leaving a donation if they’re able, according to project co-ordinator Mike Ellard.

The project – which makes use of two redundant greenhouses and surrounding land – is going from strength to strength, according to retired horticulturalist Mike.

Tomato, pepper and courgette plants, bedding plants, hanging baskets, fresh lettuce and rhubarb have all been selling well on the project’s trolley which goes out at weekends outside the hub. Proceeds are ploughed back into the project.

The young group has also been working on a trial vegetable patch which only needs 30 minutes’ attention each week. They have also been experimenting with growing edible lupins.

“Our wild patch has started to flower which was once a lifeless piece of ground,” Mike added.

 

 

GREEN FINGERS: volunteers planting one of the project’s raised vegetable beds.

 

Hellesdon High marks Refugee Week

Hellesdon High School pupils and staff helped highlight the 65 million displaced people around the world when they took part in a number of events marking Refugee Week 2018.

A pop-up lunchtime gig featuring moving performances, touching on the theme of home and identity, was enjoyed by a crowd of cheering students.

Performers included Deanna Matthews, 11, Liah Brown, 13, Nelma Lemos, 15, all-girl band The Caravan Club, and the rock band Black Rose.

A small group of Key Stage 3 students joined other schools for an art workshop at The Octagon Chapel, where the children created their own flags around a refuge theme. The flags featured at an art installation for the Norwich Schools of Sanctuary Showcase evening which celebrated this year’s Refugee Week theme – the contributions, creativity and resilience of refugees. It included original pieces of music, poetry and drama created by Norwich children.

Hellesdon High, part of the Wensum Trust, also invited a guest speaker to hold year-group assemblies. Dr Eiad Zinah spoke about his long journey to the UK, which he had to make in order to escape the violence in Syria.

A series of creative short films and animations was screened in one of the drama classrooms and staff brought in home-baked goods for a bake sale that raised £85 for New Routes Integration. The school will also be running a non-uniform day toward the end of term where further funds will be raised for the same local charity, which works with refugees and asylum-seekers in Norwich.

The week also saw most curriculum subjects focusing on the theme of displacement and how to welcome and support refugees locally. In English lessons younger students wrote poetry to advocate the integration of refugees into our local community and older students analysed the poetry of contemporary refugees from Sudan and Somalia.

PE examined famous athletes, particularly footballers, who are also refugees, to tie in with the World Cup, and in maths students explored the practical budgeting and financial implications of being a refugee in Britain.

English teacher Jess Baker, who organised Refugee Week in school, said: “I feel incredibly proud of the sensitive and empathic work produced by students during Refugee Week. A common phrase produced in the children’s work was that here at Hellesdon ‘refugees are welcome’, which I believe is reflective of our students’ capacity for celebrating our differences”.

The school’s aim for the week was to create awareness among students about why people become refugees, in order to create a greater understanding and to overcome hostility.

Roz Yassin, another key organiser of Refugee Week at the school, said: “We feel that we have succeeded in what we set out to do. Students have responded really well to the lessons and activities and have shown a keen interest in the cause. We want Hellesdon High to be a place where human kindness is instinctive and cultural diversity is celebrated.”

CARAVAN CLUB: Hellesdon High’s all-girls’ band.

 

 

 

UNDER: Black Rose


 

 

 

 


FLAG: the work of 12-year-old Sinduja.

From patients to pottery

Work experience students Evie Cowling, Sophie Smith and Kitty Foss spoke to Jane Bond about how a pottery hobby has escalated into selling her plates, bowls and more to friends and businesses

 

Retired theatre nurse Jane Bond never expected to make a second career of her hobby when she discovered a love for clay after a six-week pottery course.

Now, a year on from finding her creativity streak, she is supplying a top Norwich restaurant with plates, dishes and bowls as well taking on commissions.

“It wasn’t something I had thought of doing before,” she said. “Perhaps the creativity streak is something to do with the caring side as a nurse.”

Her hobby became a passion and, after posting photos of her pieces on Facebook, she instantly had requests from various friends asking her to make something for them.

But it was at Worstead Festival last year, where Jane’s talents suddenly had a larger audience. She said: “I help out each year behind the scenes in hospitality and washing up for the chefs in the kitchen theatre. I was a bit cheeky and asked if the chefs would use my plates to hand round the food they were cooking.”

They attracted the attention of Roger Hickman, the owner and head chef of his highly-commended, fine dining restaurant in Norwich and he asked her about providing tableware for him and to contact him after the festival.

“I didn’t didn’t have the confidence at the time to ask him about it,” she said, and time lapsed. Six months later, he posted a picture of Jane’s tableware online and got in touch to order more than 100 pieces, from serving dishes to amuse bouche bowls.

It was a big change from making single items for friends, so she decided it was time to invest in her own kiln. She’s now thinking of buying another to keep up with orders.

So far she has not had to advertise her wares, using social media and word of mouth to spread the word. She said: This keeps it close to home and more bespoke as she thinks it’s extremely important that “it doesn’t become a production line”.

Last Christmas, at a small fair in Worstead, Jane noticed the amount of artistic talent within the village and how there wasn’t really anything or anywhere local to showcase their talents.

So, at this year’s Worstead Festival, she has got together with like-minded artisans to launch Made in Worstead, which will be held on the Sunday, July 29 (Saturday, July 28, will be a produce show).

The idea isn’t just to sell their work, but also to attract more artists from the area to get involved and start to build a bigger community of local people who enjoy art. Jane made it clear that it’s important to her that it stays “handmade and original” to make the group different and unique.

She has various plans for the future, both personal and for the artisan crafts group, including her own studio so she has more space to build up her collection. She has many ideas for the group, such as a Christmas fair in the church and organising demonstrations and workshops in the village hall.

The overall aim is to get people involved so that they may even find something they love doing, just like she did with pottery a year and a half ago, which has become so much more than just a hobby.

PICTURES: SOPHIE SMITH