Author Archives: Gay Webster

Victims of domestic abuse to benefit from £100,000 funding

Domestic abuse experts Leeway are teaming up with a trio of district and borough councils to make use of £100,000 extra funding.

The extra money will be added to ongoing efforts to support domestic abuse victims across North Norfolk, West Norfolk and Breckland over the next two years.

The money is part of a national £20 million fund announced by the government in the last few days and it is anticipated the money will help 117 women and 142 children.

Funding will be used across the three council areas to pay for a specialist domestic abuse case worker with mental health and substance misuse expertise; a dedicated refuge bed space for women with no recourse to public funds or for those who are not economically active or those who have lost their eligibility status; a rent-guarantee scheme enabling women to move on to independent living quicker in the private rent sector.

Mandy Proctor, chief executive of Leeway, said: “It is fantastic that local councils have secured funding to support those experiencing domestic abuse. The work we do in partnership with local authorities is extremely important and it is vital that we are able to continue to offer a high-quality service to those that need it. It is fantastic that the government are taking a proactive stance to tackle domestic abuse, which will undoubtedly make a massive difference to many people that are experiencing domestic abuse.”

Richard Price, North Norfolk District Council’s cabinet member for housing, said: “This is about helping people in very difficult situations make informed choices at the right time, whatever their level of need. The bid put together by Leeway and the three authorities has been recognised as having great potential and we all look forward to its success into the future.”

Leeway is also running fundraising events throughout the year, like this skydive. There are still spaces if you would like to support them.

Children’s charity gets £10,000 from Roys

Charity Nelson’s Journey has received a £10,000 donation from Roys of Wroxham to help its work with bereaved children.

Nelson’s Journey was chosen as Roys charity of the year to receive all donations raised through sale of 5p carrier bags at Roys’ eight stores and Highway Garden and Leisure.

Sarah Hyde from Nelson’s Journey said: “We are absolutely amazed by the incredible support offered from Roys and their customers. We are pleased to have the backing of such a wonderful organisation, full of staff enthusiastic about our charity.”

The £10,000 can fund 40 children to attend one of the therapeutic residential weekends at Hilltop in Sheringham. The weekend is packed full of team building, coping strategies and memory work with other children and young people of a similar age, giving them the right tools and confidence to move forward positively with their lives.

Ed Roy, managing director at Roys, presented the cheque, saying: “We are very pleased to be helping such a worthwhile cause, Roys would like to thank each and every customer that has donated money by purchasing a carrier bag and we look forward to being able to present Nelson’s Journey with future donations throughout the year.”

If you would like to donate or would like help from the child bereavement support team at Nelson’s Journey then you can find more details at http://www.nelsonsjourney.org.uk/

Photo left to right: Ed Roy (Managing Director Roys), Simon Wright (Chief Executive Nelson’s Journey), Sarah Hyde (Community Funding and Marketing Officer Nelson’s Journey)

Apply for share of £17,500 community funding

Community groups across North Norfolk are being invited to bid for a share of a £17,500 windfall, with the latest round of funding from the Victory Housing Community Fund.

Charities, voluntary groups, community organisations and parish councils can bid for grants of up to £5,000, to be used for a wide range of purposes, including capital projects, venue hire, equipment, start-up expenses and training.

The fund, which aims to provide support for community groups which are making a difference at grassroots level in local communities, was started by Victory Housing Trust in 2008, and has so far given out a total of 134 grants totalling £368,385.

The last round of grants, in November, saw eight community groups receive grants of between £400 and £5,000, to help with projects as diverse as transforming an allotment and surrounding land into a junior ball games area, helping to employ a manager at a food bank, training volunteers to support families in their communities, and purchasing archery equipment for a Scout group.

Groups have until Monday, April 3, to submit their bids, with the decision about where the money goes being made by a panel made up of Victory Housing Trust residents, advised by the grants team at Norfolk Community Foundation, which administers the fund on behalf of Victory.

“We are delighted once again to open our community fund for grants bids,” said Victory Housing Trust chief executive John Archibald.  “In the past nine years we have supported so many fantastic community initiatives, helping those organisations which really make our communities tick at grassroots level.

“The process of applying for a grant is simple and user-friendly, and we particularly encourage bids from organisations which have not applied before.”

Applications for grants can be made by any organisation or group established for charitable purposes, provided there is a formal structure which allows for monitoring of activity and feedback – official charitable status is not necessary.  The fund is looking for applications from voluntary and community groups in the North of Norfolk whose primary aim is to improve the quality of people’s lives.

Full details of how to apply for grants from the Victory Housing Community Fund can be found at www.norfolkfoundation.com/funds/victory-housing-trust-community-fund.

 

 

 

Sheringham deli celebrates British Pie Week

Sheringham pie maker Mark Wood is getting ready to celebrate British Pie week from March 6-12

The owner of the Town Deli in Sheringham has targeted the UK trend in ready-made pies and is stocking up on his range.

Mark said: “Over the year we have been displaying more than 30 varieties of pies – meat, fish, vegetarian and gluten free selections. Many are from award-winning bakers, like the Pieminister, Tom’s Pies, and our local Walsingham Pies. We try to make sure there’s a pie for every taste, special need and price. We recently helped a pie and mash charity evening by supplying their individual pie tastes for each of their guests.”

Mark is trying to find the best from the producers of traditional pies and discovering some of the new speciality varieties, so he can showcase the current trends in British pie making in North Norfolk.

Work starts March 6 on new Felbrigg roundaabout

Work is set to start on Monday, March 6, on a long-campaigned-for improvement at the junction of the A148 and B1436 at Felbrigg near Cromer.

This follows the announcement in June 2016 that the funding had been secured from a number of partners for the new £619,000 roundabout.

To allow the scheme to go ahead Hilary Cox, local county councillor for Cromer, worked to secure pledges of money from Norfolk County Council, the New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP), North Norfolk District Council, Cromer Town Council, local parish councils of Roughton, Runton and Felbrigg, and developers and local businesses.

The work is expected to take 12 weeks to complete so the new roundabout should be in place by the end of May.

She said: “It’s so gratifying, after so many years of effort, to see this scheme about to start and backed by such a wide range of community supporters. The new roundabout means the junction will be much easier to negotiate, safer, and encourage vehicles that do not need to stop in Cromer to bypass it and cut congestion in the town.

“I’m looking forward to seeing the roundabout ready not only for all the local residents and businesses but also all the people who come to enjoy this lovely part of the world during the busy summer season.”

Martin Wilby, chairman of the Norfolk County Council’s environment, transport and development committee said: “This is a great example of a community coming together to deliver a local priority. This new roundabout will benefit local people and visitors alike.

“We try to minimise disruption during roadworks but know that delays are likely while the work is under way so we thank people for their patience while this much called for local scheme is built.

“It’s the first time we’ve seen a scheme made possible through partners’ contributions. This could well point the way forward for other requests for larger schemes which don’t meet the criteria for the county council to fund alone but which could be made possible if enough partners can chip in.”

During the majority of the work both the A148 and the B1436 will remain open however delays are likely as traffic will be controlled by temporary traffic lights so motorists are advised to leave extra time for their journeys.A temporary closure of the route will be required when the new roundabout is being surfaced.

Sue Arnold, North Norfolk District Council ward member for Felbrigg and chairman of the Steps to Safety Campaign said: “North Norfolk District Council is pleased to have been able to contribute nearly £30,000 to this project that will improve safety on the roads for our residents while cutting congestion and making visiting our beautiful area better for tourists.

“To get to this point after so many years is terrific, and it has taken hard work and strong support from many sides. I would especially like to thank the dedication and financial contribution made by local parish councils that have given at a level out of proportion to their relatively small size.”

‘Vibrant’ new look for former Sheringham seafront hotel

A first-floor restaurant with panoramic views over the promenade and the sea will be an integral part of a development planned for the site of the former Shannocks Hotel in Sheringham.
Wymondham-based architects Lucas Hickman Smith have designed plans for owners Huddies to transform the derelict hotel on the seafront into vibrant new building with the restaurant, shops and flats in keeping with the town’s heritage and the nearby buildings.
The ground-floor retail units, first-floor restaurant and residential apartments on the upper floors will all have sea views to take advantage of its position overlooking the beach.
Company director Andrew Roper said: “We believe the application proposes a vibrant, forward-looking new building, of high architectural quality and demonstrating a clear link to Sheringham’s heritage and its immediate context.
“We are keen for local life to be enhanced by the proposed development, and in particular that the wider community should have the opportunity to enjoy the expansive views over the promenade, the beach and the sea that are offered by the site’s location.”
An application for full planning permission has been submitted to North Norfolk District Council and comes at a time when the council was considering applying for a compulsory purchase order on the site for an alternative development, incorporating the site of the Former Shannocks Hotel and the adjacent Chequers Car Park, which is owned by NNDC.
Judy Oliver, for NNDC, said: “As per the last cabinet decision, we are maintaining pressure on the owners to move forward with development, by putting our own development proposals forward for planning approval, along with a voluntary offer to purchase the derelict hotel from them.”
However, Huddies has urged it to rethink its proposals in light of its application.
“The acquiring authority pays all of the costs of the CPO and the public inquiry, and is usually ordered to pay a successful objector’s legal and professional costs,” said Mr Roper, adding it would “not be in the interests of local ratepayers”.
John Western, a director at Lucas Hickman Smith architects said the company had looked at re-developing the current building but that it was in too poor a state. He said: “The fabric and structure are in a bad state and there are issues with salt saturation.”Mr Roper said: “Retention and renovation of existing buildings is not always an option and the professional and expert opinion received by the company is that this cannot be justified, and would detrimentally impact upon the viability of the scheme. NNDC’s alternative scheme, which was displayed at a consultation event in December, suggests that they have received similar advice from their own property advisors.
“In addition, the existing building’s solid wall construction precludes most forms of thermal insulation and, together with a permeable external skin, has meant that the building has been unable to resist salt spray in its exposed location, leading to significant damp problems.
“The company’s objective of achieving a high level of thermal and environmental performance from the building can only be achieved through demolition and redevelopment.”
If the plans are approved, which the site’s owner expects will take approximately three months, it is hoped work could start before the end of the year, though the developers, who bought the site in late 2010, said that works would steer clear of the summer season.
Mr Roper said: “We are keen to ensure that we minimise disruption to local businesses during the tourist season, and this approach was supported by NNDC when we submitted our project execution plan to them in September of last year.”
He added: “The site is significant in the context of Sheringham and North Norfolk, and the company is fully committed to providing this positive, contemporary addition to the town, which it fully expects will benefit the local community, providing employment in the ground and first-floor commercial spaces, improving the commercial viability of the high street, attracting visitors to the town and presenting a bright, optimistic and forward-looking vision for the seafront and the town.”
The council earlier this month said it could stop the compulsory purchase order at any time if the current site owners were seen to be taking action to tidy up the area.

Coffee Means Business in Cromer

Coffee Means Business is in Cromer this week for networking, hosted by Genix the business support agency for Norfolk’s business community.

January’s Coffee Means Business attracted more then 35 business people from a wide area who made new contacts over tea and coffee in the conservatory at Scarborough Hill Country Inn, North Walsham.

The speakers included Paul Brittain, who has recently established his company, Norfolk360. He’s a trusted Google supplier of 360 degree videos for Google Streetview. Paul showed how easy it is to increase footfall and sales by improving your online presence with internal and external tours of business premises. He showcased two companies who he has recently with worked onsite, Deer’s Glade Camping and Caravan Park and at Heydon Village Tea Shop, to bring both businesses to life, online.

Andrew Winship of Andrew David Photography, a new Genix patron, shared examples of both still life photography and videos to show how the most mundane products and business services can be improved and enhanced with great photography for print, social media and websites to encourage potential customers to buy. Short videos are becoming a must for business websites and Andrew showed different ways they can be used to get a business message across.

North Norfolk District Council commissioned Genix to organise and host Coffee Means Business in the North Norfolk area as they could see there was a need for a regular networking opportunity for businesses which didn’t involve expensive membership fees.

Genix were chosen because it is a not for profit organisation which, for more than 20 years, has been supporting businesses. In Norfolk, the organisation provides free business advice sessions for established businesses and start-ups, subsidised business skills courses and events for ambitious small businesses and self-employed people.

Nigel Dixon, cabinet member for business and economic development said: “It was a good informal session and a chance to hear directly from companies in our region. I’d encourage other businesses to come along to the next Coffee Means Business on Friday (February 17) at 9.30am at the Red Lion in Cromer.”

For more details regarding Genix and its subsidised services go to www.genix.org.uk or call 0800 096 3013.

Paul Brittain of Norfok360 at Coffee Means Business

Ruth Lowe of Ruth Elizabethevents.co.uk at CMB North Walsham

Kieran gets a warm welcome at Cromer

Heart transplant patient Kieran Sandwell got a warm welcome in Cromer and Happisburgh as he stopped off during his 5,000-mile trek around Britain to help raise £100,000 for the British Heart Foundation’s (BHF) life saving research.

Kieran, 45, from Berkhamsted in Hertfordshire, is currently walking the Norfolk Coast Path in his challenge Trail of Two Hearts to mark the end of his long battle with heart disease after having a heart transplant eight years ago.

After setting off on February 1 from the British Heart Foundation office in London, Kieran’s journey has seen him walking the coast of Norfolk, with members of the public supporting him on his journey to help him raise his target. This included a fundraising quiz organised by Ginny Wilson-North, from MargGins Walking and Glamping, at the home of Tessa and Terry Beane in Happisburgh on Saturday night when £100 was raised and being greeted by Walkers are Welcome members and the deputy mayor in Cromer yesterday.

He said: “The inspiration came to me around 25 years ago, but then I would never have been able to complete such an endurance challenge. It’s only thanks to my donor, the BHF, the Brompton and Papworth Hospital and NHS Blood & Transplant that I am able to make my dream a reality.

“My second heart has enabled me to do so much and I’m urging the public to help me support the BHF’s ground-breaking research by making a donation.”

Kieran’s battle with heart disease began when he was just three years old, when he had to have open heart surgery to correct a condition called transposition of the great arteries (TGA) where the main arteries in the heart are ‘plumbed’ back to front.

Then when Kieran was 13 he suffered a heart attack and during his early twenties he also suffered two mini strokes and began having abnormal heart rhythms. By the time he reached 35, he was in heart failure and he was put on the transplant list for a new heart.

In July 2009, Kieran received his new heart and donated his old heart for BHF-funded research into congenital heart disease which has contributed to important findings and helped others living with conditions like his.

Dawne Hart, BHF Fundraising Manager for Norfolk, said:  “We never cease to be amazed by the incredible way our fundraisers raise money for our research, but Kieran’s coastline challenge is one of the biggest we’ve ever seen. We are so incredibly grateful for his determination and dedication to supporting our work and we’ll be supporting him every step of the way.”

To support Kieran on his journey and find out how you can get involved or to sponsor him visit www.atrailoftwohearts.com

Also follow his journey and get in touch at
https://www.facebook.com/atrailoftwohearts/
https://www.atrailoftwohearts.com/Blog
https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/ATrailofTwoHearts